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CBPTomsheck’s “July Amnesty”: CBP IA loses hundreds of cases alleging criminal activity by CBP Employees -- Pt. 3

By Robert Lee Maril

Published 12 January 2015

An unprecedented scandal continues to unfold within Customs and Border Protection (CBP). Fueling this scandal are allegations by James F. Tomsheck about the U.S. largest federal law enforcement agency. Further investigation suggests that the “July Amnesty,” initiated in Tomsheck’s CBP IA’s Integrity Programs Division (IPD) headed by Director Janine Corrado and Assistant Director Jeffrey Matta, casts doubt on Tomsheck’s allegations against his CBP superiors. Along with the July Amnesty in 2011 and the alleged discrimination and firing of Navy Lieutenant Commander (Ret.) J. Gregory Richardson in March 2014, there appear to be a number of other events calling Tomsheck’s leadership at CBP IA into question.

Background
An unprecedented scandal continues to unfold within Customs and Border Protection (CBP). Fueling this scandal are allegations by James F. Tomsheck about the U.S. largest federal law enforcement agency. Further investigation suggests that the “July Amnesty,” initiated in Tomsheck’s CBP IA’s Integrity Programs Division (IPD) headed by Director Janine Corrado and Assistant Director Jeffrey Matta, casts doubt on Tomsheck’s allegations against his CBP superiors. At the same time, facts discovered suggest scrutiny of Tomsheck’s leadership decisions at CBP IA.

Tomsheck is the CBP’s Internal Affairs (CBP IA) senior official who sought immediate legal cover last summer under the Whistleblower Protection Act (WPA) of 1989. Tomsheck, who held the title of Assistant Director of CBP IA, made several astounding disclosures about how, he says, the CBP conducted its affairs. This is the second time that Tomsheck has sought protection under the WPA.

Tomsheck talked at length to Center for Investigative Research reporter Andrew Becker (Andrew Becker, “Ousted Chief Accuses Border Agency of Shooting Cover-ups, Corruption,” 14 August 2014]. During this revealing and possibly unauthorized interview, Tomsheck charged CBP with conducting its regular duties and affairs beyond “constitutional constraints.”

Benefiting from dramatic growth after the events of 9/11, CBP is currently our largest federal law enforcement agency employing more than 60,000. Its stated mission is, “… keeping terrorists and their weapons out of the U.S. while facilitating lawful international travel and trade.”

At CBP about 45,000 men and women are front line U.S. Border Patrol Agents, commonly referred to as Agents, and U.S. Customs Officers, commonly referred to as Officers. These Agents, according to CBP, “…protect 1,900 miles of our border with Mexico and 5,000 miles of our border with Canada,” In contrast, Officers, “…ensure the Nation’s safety by screening passengers and cargo at over 300 ports of entry.”

Most criminal allegations against these Agents and Officers are first scrutinized by Security Analysts in the Integrity Programs Division (IPD), one of seven divisions at CBP IA under the leadership of Tomsheck.