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RefugeesCanada avoids sex attacks by accepting refugee families over single men

Published 19 January 2016

Canada’s immigration minister John McCallum said Canada will not suffer from Cologne-style sex attacks because the country “carefully selects” the Syrian refugees it takes in. McCallum said that because Canada has welcomed Syrian refugees “with open hearts and love,” Canadians will not be affected by their resettlement as Germany has been. “Most of them are not single men. Most of them are family members. Whereas Germany accepts everybody that comes to its borders,” McCallum said.

Canada’s immigration minister John McCallum said Canada will not suffer from Cologne-style sex attacks because the country “carefully selects” the Syrian refugees it takes in.

McCallum said that because Canada has welcomed Syrian refugees “with open hearts and love,” Canadians will not be affected by their resettlement as Germany has been.

CBC reports that in a speech last week, McCallum addressed the issue of resettlement of the more than 10,000 refugees who arrived in Canada.

“We are mindful of the situation in Germany, but let me remind you that we are talking about 25,000 Syrian refugees, while Germany has accepted close to a million,” said McCallum.

“The one’s we have accepted, we have carefully selected them. Most of them are not single men. Most of them are family members.

Canadians have generally welcomed the refugees, but in Germany the public sentiment is turning sour.

The German ZDF (Zweites Deutsches Fernsehen) TV conducted a poll which showed that Germans are more pessimistic about refugees, with 60 per cent of people surveyed now saying they believe Chancellor Merkel has handled the situation poorly.

McCallum concluded his speech by saying: “I think the two situations are quite different in the sense of the numbers involved and the kinds of people coming into our country.

He said: “I also think we have a pretty good history in this area of successfully integrating newcomers.”

The minister stressed that Canada is not putting Syrian refugees ahead of its own people, especially when it comes to issues such as social housing.

The country had pledged to settle 25,000 refugees by 31 December, but lowered the figure to 10,000 in November.