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Our picksAI & anthrax detection; surveillance at the border; 53-year old tech controls U.S. nukes, and more

Published 11 August 2017

AI makes anthrax bioterror detection easier; What we know about North Korea’s quest for nuclear weapons; When words risk provoking war; U.S. can intercept North Korean missiles, general says; Immigration bill would ramp up mass surveillance at the border; Reuniting families has driven US immigration. What would ending that mean for Californians? Reminder: U.S. nuclear system runs on early computers and 8-inch floppy disks.

AI makes anthrax bioterror detection easier (Jeremy Hsu, IEEE Spectrum)
Detection of such lethal anthrax spores could get a speed boost from artificial intelligence that has learned to identify the telltale patterns of the dangerous bacteria within microscope images.

What we know about North Korea’s quest for nuclear weapons (Adam Taylor, Washington Post)
The crisis over nuclear weapons didn’t come out of nowhere. Here’s what you need to know about North Korea’s long-standing quest to acquire nuclear weapons:

When words risk provoking war (Kori Schake, Defense One) Words especially matter between societies that poorly understand each other’s motivations and intentions, as do North Korea and the U.S.

U.S. can intercept North Korean missiles, general says (Oriana Pawlyk, Defense Tech)
The head of the Pentagon’s missile defense agency on Wednesday said recent missile intercept tests give him confidence the U.S. can protect itself from wide variety of threats, including an intercontinental ballistic missile from North Korea.

Immigration bill would ramp up mass surveillance at the border (Jenna McLaughlin, Kavitha Surana, Foreign Policy)
The 200-page bill calls for drones, facial recognition, biometric data collection, and more personnel.

Reuniting families has driven US immigration. What would ending that mean for Californians? (Hannah Knowles, Sacramento Bee)
In the city of Sacramento, where the latest census data show over a fifth of the population is foreign-born. Many residents with foreign family members are hastening their plans to help relatives immigrate, despite the bill’s tough odds in Congress.

Reminder: U.S. nuclear system runs on early computers and 8-inch floppy disks (Max Kutner, Newsweek)
The U.S. nuclear program is in need of modernization. As of May 2016, the Department of Defense was running its nuclear system on what was 53-year-old technology.