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Our picksFar right’s threat to national security; Charlotesville’s homeland security lessons; Spain & terrorism, and more

Published 18 August 2017

What is the far right’s threat to national security?; The signs that right-wing extremists were growing increasingly dangerous; Trump administration ends Obama-era protection program for Central American minors; Three homeland security lessons from Charlottesville: Michael Chertoff; Trump calls for the United States to imitate fake war crimes to fight terrorism; Spain, home to independence movements, no stranger to terrorism.

What is the far right’s threat to national security? (interview of Cas Mudde by Zachary Laub, Foreign Affairs)
“Within the U.S. the threat from the far right is bigger than that from jihadists,” Mudde says. But despite this, he says, the U.S. government has long devoted insufficient resources to domestic far-right movements, and many of these groups now feel emboldened by Donald J. Trump’s presidency.

The signs that right-wing extremists were growing increasingly dangerous (Alan Neuhauser, U.S. News)
Law enforcement has been warning for years that white supremacists were becoming dangerously belligerent.

Trump administration ends Obama-era protection program for Central American minors (David Nakamura, Washington Post)
The Trump administration on Wednesday formally terminated an Obama-era program that granted Central American minors temporary legal residence in the United States, shutting the door on 2,714 people who had won conditional approval to enter the country.

Three homeland security lessons from Charlottesville: Michael Chertoff (Michael Chertoff, USA Today)
Virginia didn’t have the right plan, needed more boots on the ground, and failed to stop violence upfront. We can’t afford to repeat these mistakes when more racial provocations are on the way.

Trump calls for the United States to imitate fake war crimes to fight terrorism (Matthew Yglesias, Vox)
This didn’t happen, and it makes no sense.

Spain, home to independence movements, no stranger to terrorism (Alex Johnson, NBC News)
ETA was formed in Spanish Basque territory 1959, and over the next four decades, it pursued a campaign of violence and assassination that fueled the development of far-right opposition groups that added to the bloodshed.