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Our picksFlorida defunded coastal agency; Saudis & 9/11; U.S. no ready for cyberwar, and more

Published 11 September 2017
  • Florida risks more Irma devastation because Gov. Rick Scott defunded wetlands agency
  • A requiem for Florida, the paradise that should never have been
  • Israel just bombed a chemical weapons factory that Syria shouldn’t have had
  • The risk of nuclear war with North Korea
  • Lawsuit uses FBI documents to link Saudis to 9/11 attacks
  • Germany’s election software is dangerously hackable
  • Winter is here, but the U.S. is not ready for cyber war
  • Why one president gave up his country’s nukes

Florida risks more Irma devastation because Gov. Rick Scott defunded wetlands agency (Eoin Higgins, The Intercept)
Republican Gov. Rick Scott of Florida, prioritizing development over ecological restoration of wetlands, six years ago cut funding for the state’s water management districts in 2011, leading to staff reductions and less funding for ecosystem restoration projects.

A requiem for Florida, the paradise that should never have been (Michael Grunwald, Politico Magazine)
It is worth remembering that Mother Nature never intended us to live here.

Israel just bombed a chemical weapons factory that Syria shouldn’t have had (Alex Ward, Vox)
This could also raise tensions with Iran and Hezbollah.

The risk of nuclear war with North Korea (Evan Osnos, New Yorker)
On the ground in Pyongyang: Could Kim Jong Un and Donald Trump goad each other into a devastating confrontation?

Lawsuit uses FBI documents to link Saudis to 9/11 attacks (Jack Davis, Western Journalism)
“A pattern of both financial and operational support.”

Germany’s election software is dangerously hackable (Andy Greenberg, Wired)
Researchers Uncover Serious Holes in Germany’s Voting Software

Winter is here, but the U.S. is not ready for cyber war (Alex Wagner, Defense One)
How can DHS and Congress protect HBO and Equifax when they’re slow to protect their own ‘.gov’ domains?

Why one president gave up his country’s nukes (Uri Friedman, The Atlantic)
In dealing with North Korea, says F.W. de Klerk, remember that “inner conviction weighs heavier on the scale than international pressure.”