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Our picks9/11 in retrospect; South Florida’s Achilles’ heel; White nationalists love Bashar al-Assad, and more

Published 12 September 2017
  • 9/11 ended a golden age
  • How al-Qaeda benefits from America’s political divisions
  • More than 10 million people lost power in Florida
  • South Florida’s Achilles’ heel
  • America has a toxic waste hurricane problem
  • Why White nationalists love Bashar al-Assad
  • Trump doesn’t understand the economics of immigration
  • The case against the Iranian nuclear deal is one big lie

9/11 ended a golden age (Kevin D. Williamson, National Review)
We were so impressed by our victory over the Soviet Union that we failed to appreciate that 19 Islamic fanatics with box-cutters had a sense of History, too.

How al-Qaeda benefits from America’s political divisions (Ali Soufan, Defense One)
If the United States wishes to defeat bin Laden’s heirs and the toxic potency of their message, it needs to recommit to its most basic values.

More than 10 million people lost power in Florida (Alexis C. Madrigal, Atlantic)
Thanks to Hurricane Irma, the southwest of the state’s electrical grid will need a “wholesale rebuild.”

South Florida’s Achilles’ heel (Alexia Fernández Campbell, Vox)
Miami can’t prevent flooding from a summer storm, let alone a hurricane.

America has a toxic waste hurricane problem (Emily Atkin, New Republic)
Harvey flooded many Superfund sites. Irma likely will, too. And yet, EPA chief Scott Pruitt has cut climate change preparedness for such sites.

Why White nationalists love Bashar al-Assad (Mariam Elba, The Intercept)
It shouldn’t be surprising that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad has become an idol among white nationalists in the United States.

Trump doesn’t understand the economics of immigration (Linda Chavez, Foreign Policy)
The United States is facing an aging population and a lack of skilled workers. The president’s immigration policy is only going to make it worse.

The case against the Iranian nuclear deal is one big lie (Stephen M. Walt, Foreign Policy)
There’s no reason to trust any of the Trump administration’s criticisms of, or plans for replacing, the JCPOA.