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The Iranian connection Argentinian prosecutor to review mounting forensic evidence that proves Nisman was murdered

Published 19 September 2017

An Argentinian prosecutor will assess the findings of a group of forensic analysts who discovered more evidence indicating that Argentinian prosecutor Alberto Nisman was murdered. Nisman, who investigated the ties between Iran and the July 1994 bombing of a Jewish community center in Buenos Aires, as well as a cover up by the previous Argentine government of Iran’s role in the attack, was found dead with a bullet wound to the head in January 2015. His death came hours before he was scheduled to appear before a closed session of the Argentinian Congress.

The late Alberto Nisman, now thought to be a murder victim // Source: theconversation.com

An Argentinian prosecutor will assess the findings of a group of forensic analysts who discovered more evidence indicating that Argentinian prosecutor Alberto Nisman was murdered, the Times of Israel reported. The investigative team, composed of twenty-eight experts ranging from psychology to ballistics concluded that Nisman was drugged and that at least one person forcefully held him down. The new report also found bruises in Nisman’s left leg, head, nose, and abdomen the Argentine news site Infobae reported on Thursday.

The report also highlighted that only two footprints belonging to Nisman were found in his Puerto Madero apartment. This finding is inconsistent with Nisman’s activities on previous days, suggesting that the suspect or suspects carefully cleaned Nisman’s apartment before they left to cover any tracks.

Lastly, experts explained that the position and angle of the gunshot are not compatible with that of a self-inflicted wound, making it physically impossible for Nisman to have committed suicide that way.

The report will be sent to the attorney leading the case, Eduardo Taino, this week who will assess how to present the new findings to the Justice Department.

A toxicology report released in late August found ketamine and clonazepam in Nisman’s blood at the time of his death. The report released on Thursday indicated that neither drug was found in the apartment.

Nisman, who investigated the ties between Iran and the AMIA bombing, as well as a cover up by the previous Argentine government of Iran’s role in the attack, was found dead with a bullet wound to the head in January 2015. His death came hours before he was scheduled to appear before a closed session of the Argentinian Congress. Before his death, Nisman drafted arrest warrants for then President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner and Foreign Minister Hector Timerman.

In an interview with Infobae last week, Kirchner vehemently dismissed the allegations and denied that her government had any connection to the prosecutor’s death. “It is nonsense,” Kirchner said.

Kirchner and Timerman could face treason charges for the secret memorandum of understanding signed with Tehran.

In 2016, Nisman’s case was moved to federal court which handles political murder cases.

Last week, during his visit to Argentina, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu attended memorials for the 1992 and 1994 terror attacks in Buenos Aires and promised that Israel will continue to fight Iranian terror. Additionally, he thanked Argentinian President Mauricio Macri for his commitment to finding the truth about the terror attacks.

This article is published courtesy of The Tower