Our picksStopping president-ordered nuclear strike; soldiers as guinea pigs; bioterrorism tests, and more

Published 21 November 2017

· Carter Page held high-level Hungarian meetings for Trump campaign

· Don’t Count on the cabinet to stop a Trump-ordered nuclear strike

· The Breakthrough: Used as ‘guinea pigs’ by the U.S. military, then discarded

· Destroyer of worlds

· Sonoma County did not consider using mass cellphone alerts to warn of fires, top emergency official says

· All the times Jared Kushner has failed to tell Congress something important

· Bioterrorism tests spark fears along the Kansas border

· In the era of virtual terrorism, all cyber-enabled nations are equal

Carter Page held high-level Hungarian meetings for Trump campaign (Matthew Mosk, ABC News)The Trump campaign has described Page as a low-level volunteer.

Don’t Count on the cabinet to stop a Trump-ordered nuclear strike (Edward-Isaac Dovere, Politico)
James Mattis and Rex Tillerson can’t stop a nuclear war if President Trump wants one, says former Defense Secretary Bill Perry.

The Breakthrough: Used as ‘guinea pigs’ by the U.S. military, then discarded (Jessica Huseman, ProPublica)
During World War II, the government subjected thousands of troops to mustard gas tests — and kept it a secret. More than 60 years later, an NPR reporter and researcher helped the men get justice.

Destroyer of worlds·(Elaine Scarry et al, Harper’s)
Taking stock of our nuclear present

Sonoma County did not consider using mass cellphone alerts to warn of fires, top emergency official says (Julie Johnson, Press Democrat)
The county’s five staff members trained to send a forced message to cellphones didn’t even discuss whether to use the Wireless Emergency Alert system to warn people in the fires’ path.

All the times Jared Kushner has failed to tell Congress something important (Zeeshan Aleem, Vox)
He’s constantly keeping the government in the dark about suspicion-arousing information.

Bioterrorism tests spark fears along the Kansas border (Justin Wingerter, Oklahoman)
Nearby residents question safety of Department of Homeland Security tests in abandoned Oklahoma school

In the era of virtual terrorism, all cyber-enabled nations are equal (Daniel Wagner, Huffington Post)
Governments spy on one another, and on their people―that is what governments do. They always have and they always will. But in the era of Virtual Terrorism, spying has been taken to a whole new dimension, wherein access to other nations’ secrets, their businesses, and their people have intersected with the promotion of state interest as a new art form.