Our picksTerrorist interrogation team withers; phishing schemes; fixing FISA, and more

Published 5 December 2017

· Elite terrorist interrogation team withers under Trump

· A guide to better national security decision-making

· Everything you need to know about Crispr gene editing

· Arrests of immigrants living illegally in U.S. surged this year

· Phishing schemes are using encrypted sites to seem legit

· Police guns are turning up in crimes, but ATF can’t talk about it

· Facebook allowed political ads that were actually scams and malware

· FISA can be fixed without risking American lives

Elite terrorist interrogation team withers under Trump (Ali Watkins, Politico)
Launched by President Barack Obama after CIA torture scandals, the High Value Detainee Interrogation Group is “floundering,” U.S. officials say.

A guide to better national security decision-making (Michael P. Dempsey, War on the Rocks)
I am convinced that while there is no one-size fits all solution to policymaking, there are several concrete and replicable steps that can be taken to improve decision-making and greatly increase the odds of arriving at an effective outcome.

Everything you need to know about Crispr gene editing (Megan Molteni, Wired)
In the last five years, biology has undergone a seismic shift as researchers around the globe have embraced a revolutionary technology called gene editing. It involves the precise cutting and pasting of DNA by specialized proteins—inspired by nature, engineered by researchers.

Arrests of immigrants living illegally in U.S. surged this year (Nick Miroff, Washington Post)
This year alone, there has been a 42-percent increase in arrests of immigrants living illegally in the United States compared to the same period last year,

Phishing schemes are using encrypted sites to seem legit (Lily Hay Newman, Wired)
A massive effort to encrypt web traffic over the last few years has made green padlocks and “https” addresses increasingly common; more than half the web now uses internet encryption protocols to keep data protected from prying eyes as it travels back and forth between sites and browsers.

Police guns are turning up in crimes, but ATF can’t talk about it (Alain Stephens, Rveal)

Fort Worth, Texas, Police Department had a plan. “In an effort to get firearms off the streets, the Fort Worth Police Department is implementing a gun buyback program,” the department announced May 18. However, the police had competition. Skirting the edges of the parking lot, a group of men stood with homemade cardboard signs outbidding the police.

Facebook allowed political ads that were actually scams and malware (Jennifer Valentino-DeVries, Jeff Larson and Julia Angwin, ProPublica)
These ads raise doubts about Facebook’s ability to monitor paid political messages. In each case, the ads ran afoul of Facebook’s own guidelines to curb misleading and malicious advertising.

FISA can be fixed without risking American lives (Michelle Richardson, Cipher Brief)
Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance act is set to expire in five weeks, and to hear current and former intelligence officials tell it, changing a single word in this statute will result in no less than the loss of American lives. This hyperbole is obscuring the nature of proposed legislative reforms and preventing a fact-based debate about how to protect everyday people from this broad surveillance authority. It’s time to get some things straight.