Our picksU.S. & “limited” North Korea strikes; when deportation is a death sentence; privacy at the border, and more

Published 9 January 2018

· U.S. weighing possibility of “limited” North Korea strikes

· Hackers target Winter Olympics with new, custom-built fileless malware

· Cybersecurity today is treated like accounting before Enron

· CBP revises rules for device searches at the border

· A judge said these kids get a green card. ICE says they get deported

· Securing government email is a critical step for U.S. cybersecurity

· MalwareTech prosecution appears to be falling apart as gov’t plays keep away with documents requested by defense

· Regulators kill Perry’s proposal to prop up coal, nuclear power plants

· When deportation is a death sentence

U.S. weighing possibility of “limited” North Korea strikes (Gerald F. Seib, Wall Street Journal)
The United States is weighing the possibility of launching strikes on North Korea, the Wall Street Journal reports. The strikes, called a “bloody nose” option, would reportedly be a “limited” strike on a North Korean facility, in retaliation for future North Korean weapons tests. U.S. officials are reportedly uncertain if they could conduct the strikes without setting off all-out war.

Hackers target Winter Olympics with new, custom-built fileless malware (Danny Palmer, ZDNet)
Researchers have uncovered a campaign targeting organisations involved with next month’s Games in South Korea, with the aim of controlling infected machines.

Cybersecurity today is treated like accounting before Enron (Nathaniel Fick, New York Times)
The tepid consequences of major cybersecurity breaches are part of a growing problem. From a corporate governance and accountability perspective, cybersecurity today is being treated like accounting was before the fallout from the Enron scandal inspired the Sarbanes-Oxley Act’s increased standards for corporate disclosures.

CBP revises rules for device searches at the border (Adam Mazmanian, FCW)
A Customs and Border Protection policy update puts new limits on the authority of law enforcement to search electronic devices at U.S. border crossings. Some privacy advocates praised the move but are still seeking legislation to clarify the rights of returning citizens and residents crossing the border into to the U.S. over their digital information and media.

A judge said these kids get a green card. ICE says they get deported (Bernice Yeung, Reveal)
For the first time, U.S. immigration officials are seeking to deport children who have received a special status for vulnerable migrants and are in the final stages of getting their green cards.

Securing government email is a critical step for U.S. cybersecurity (Alexander García-Tobar, FCW)
The Department of Homeland Security issued a binding operational directive (BOD 18-01) in October, requiring all federal agencies to implement several key measures to increase the security of their email and their websites.

MalwareTech prosecution appears to be falling apart as gov’t plays keep away with documents requested by defense (Tim Cushing, Techdirt)
Marcus Hutchins, a.k.a. MalwareTech, went from internet hero (following his inadvertent shutdown of the WannaCry ransomware) to federal government detainee in a surprisingly short amount of time. Three months after saving the world from rampaging malware built on NSA exploits, Hutchins was arrested at the Las Vegas airport as he waited for his flight home to the UK.

Regulators kill Perry’s proposal to prop up coal, nuclear power plants (Timothy Cama, The Hill)
The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Monday rejected Energy Secretary Rick Perry’s proposal to prop up coal and nuclear power plants. In a unanimous order released Monday afternoon, the five-person commission said Perry and other supporters of the proposal failed to show that current electricity markets are not just or reasonable, findings that would be necessary in order to mandate the higher electricity payments that Perry sought.

When deportation is a death sentence (Sarah Stillman, New Yorker)
Hundreds of thousands of immigrants in the U.S. may face violence and murder in their home countries. What happens when they are forced to return?