Our picksAntifa unmasked; Islamic State resurgence; engineering the world's glaciers; and more

Published 11 January 2018

· A radical new scheme to engineer the world’s glaciers

· “The war-game solutions are all horrific”: Diplomats fear a deadly miscalculation on North Korea

· Customs and Border Protection’s new policy for searching devices offers thin protection

· Trump tweets against a key national security priority

· Coalition analysis warns of potential Islamic State resurgence

· Sessions creates team to focus on Hezbollah financing and drugs

· Antifa unmasked

· WhatsApp security flaws could allow snoops to slide into group chats

· WhatsApp security flaws could allow snoops to slide into group chats

A radical new scheme to engineer the world’s glaciers (Robinson Meyer, The Atlantic)
A Princeton glaciologist says a set of mega-engineering projects may be able to avert cataclysmic sea-level rise.

“The War-Game Solutions Are All Horrific”: Diplomats Fear a Deadly Miscalculation on North Korea (Abigail Tracey, Vanity Fair)
The absence of any Trump Doctrine has injected an alarming strain of unpredictability into an already volatile situation.

Customs and Border Protection’s new policy for searching devices offers thin protection (Carrie DeCell, Just Security)

Two weeks ago, the Knight Institute and the New York Times published roughly 240 complaints by travelers detailing the “traumatizing” and “highly inappropriate” electronic device searches they endured at international airports and other U.S. borders. The Knight Institute and others have argued that suspicionless device searches violate travelers’ First and Fourth Amendment rights, and that the government should not be permitted to conduct such searches without probable cause.

Trump tweets against a key national security priority (Susan Hennessey, Benjamin Wittes, Lawfare)
When the history of President Donald Trump’s use of Twitter is written, there will be a stiff competition for his most destructive, most irresponsible tweet. A strong contender for that less-than-august honor came Thursday morning, when the president of the United States tweeted this: “House votes on controversial FISA ACT today.” This is the act that may have been used, with the help of the discredited and phony Dossier, to so badly surveil and abuse the Trump Campaign by the previous administration and others?” [— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) January 11, 2018]. It is, to be sure, not Trump’s most rhetorically outlandish tweet. It is not an attack on a person or a national or ethnic group. But this tweet is nothing less than an active intervention by the president at a delicate moment in time against the national security of the country he leads. If there is a defense of this, it can be only that Trump may not have understood what he was saying and may simply have been parroting something he heard on Fox News.

Coalition analysis warns of potential Islamic State resurgence (Rhys Dubin, Foreign Policy)
The militant group is on the run, but that doesn’t mean it won’t be back.

Sessions creates team to focus on Hezbollah financing and drugs (Josh Gerstein, Politico)
The group will examine claims in a POLITICO report that Obama’s nuclear deal sidetracked some probes.

Antifa unmasked (Will Carless, Reveal)
Perhaps nowhere in America has the metamorphosis of these black-clad protesters been more visible than in the San Francisco Bay Area.

WhatsApp security flaws could allow snoops to slide into group chats (Andy Greenberg, Wired)
When WhatsApp added end-to-end encryption to every conversation for its billion users two years ago, the mobile messaging giant significantly raised the bar for the privacy of digital communications worldwide. But one of the tricky elements of encryption—and even trickier in a group chat setting—has always been ensuring that a secure conversation reaches only the intended audience, rather than some impostor or infiltrator. And according to new research from one team of German cryptographers, flaws in WhatsApp make infiltrating the app’s group chats much easier than ought to be possible.