Our picksNorwegians & U.S. immigration; cyber vigilantes & hacktivists; Calif.’s water, and more

Published 12 January 2018

· Why Norwegians aren’t moving to the U.S.

· Skype’s rolling out end-to-end encryption for hundreds of millions of people

· Deadly mudslides are the latest natural disaster to hit California

· The country Trump wants immigrants from isn’t really interested.

· Cyber vigilantes & hacktivists: Double-edged sword against ISIS

· State police to release report on response to Sandy Hook shooting

· Smart cars collect a lot of data. FTC wants to know how it’s used.

· California is preparing to defend its waters from Trump order

Why Norwegians aren’t moving to the U.S. (Krishnadev Calamur, The Atlantic)
The country Trump wants immigrants from isn’t really interested.

Skype’s rolling out end-to-end encryption for hundreds of millions of people (Lili Hay Newman, Wired)
Skype has more than 300 million monthly users, making it one of the most popular chat platforms in the world. Now, they’ll all be able to benefit from a crucial privacy protection: Microsoft announced Thursday that Skype will offer end-to-end encryption for audio calls, text, and multimedia messages through a feature called Private Conversations.

Deadly mudslides are the latest natural disaster to hit California (Adam K. Raymond, New York Magazine)
The raging wildfires that burned through Southern California last month left behind huge swaths of charred and barren land that is now at the center of a new natural disaster. Mudslides, brought on by heavy rains and made worse by the vulnerable hillsides, have killed at least 17 people and left eight more missing.

Cyber vigilantes & hacktivists: Double-edged sword against ISIS (Levi Maxey, Cipher Brief)
Cyber vigilantes and “hacktivists” increasingly fill the void left by governments in combating terrorist activity online. While such politically motivated non-state hackers are relatively effective at removing the presence of terrorist content, their continued operations could damage overall counterterrorism efforts by undermining intelligence operations –  say by taking down a website that the CIA or NSA is monitoring. By letting these groups run loose – if even for a noble cause – the U.S. risks undermining international norms of cyber operations among states by legitimizing the phenomenon of “patriotic hackers” used as proxies by governments engaging in deniable operations.

State police to release report on response to Sandy Hook shooting (New York Post)
Sources said state police officials will present the report to the victims’ families in a private meeting Friday morning.

Pentagon thwarts 36 million email breach attempts daily (Frank Konkel, Defense One)
And you thought your inbox was dangerous.

Smart cars collect a lot of data. FTC wants to know how it’s used. (Jack Corrigan, NextGov) While some types of information may make drivers safer, others are more geared toward selling ads.

California is preparing to defend its waters from Trump order (Jane Kay, Reveal)
In its first act to shield California from the Trump administration’s repeal of regulations, the state’s water board has prepared its own rules protecting wetlands and other waters.