Flaws in U.S. emergency alert system; U.S. democracy an easy target; Russian money & NRA, and more | Homeland Security Newswire

Our picksFlaws in U.S. emergency alert system; U.S. democracy an easy target; Russian money & NRA, and more

Published 18 January 2018

· Hawaii’s false alarm revealed the stunning flaws in our emergency alert system

· As America’s nukes and sensors get more connected, the risk of cyberattack is growing

· American democracy is an easy target

· Russian cyber meddling extends well beyond elections

· FBI investigating whether Russian money went to NRA to help Trump

· Terrorists stalk Dark Web for deadlier weaponry

Hawaii’s false alarm revealed the stunning flaws in our emergency alert system(Alex Ward, Vox)
An expert explains just how convoluted the system that tells us if we’re in danger really is.

As America’s nukes and sensors get more connected, the risk of cyberattack is growing (Patrick Tucker, Defense One)
Future nuclear weapons will be more sophisticated and better integrated with other equipment. That has benefits and drawbacks.

American democracy is an easy target (Henry Farrell, Foreign Policy)
Americans have become paranoid about foreign cyberattacks on their political system, but they have nobody but themselves to blame.

Russian cyber meddling extends well beyond elections (Mark Rockwell, FCW)
A wave of fake email comments similar to the one that flooded the Federal Communications Commission’s servers this past summer, tagged to Russian IP addresses, might also swamp the servers of other federal agencies in the future, as bad actors move to subvert and undermine U.S. democratic processes, a social media expert told a Senate hearing.

FBI investigating whether Russian money went to NRA to help Trump (Peter Stone And Greg Gordon, McClatchy)
The FBI is investigating whether a top Russian banker with ties to the Kremlin illegally funneled money to the National Rifle Association to help Donald Trump win the presidency, two sources familiar with the matter have told McClatchy. FBI counterintelligence investigators have focused on the activities of Alexander Torshin, the deputy governor of Russia’s central bank who is known for his close relationships with both Russian President Vladimir Putin and the NRA, the sources said.

Terrorists stalk Dark Web for deadlier weaponry (Levi Maxey, Cipher Brief)
Terrorists are turning to the dark web’s crypto-bazaars, social media channels and e-commerce sites to buy more coveted military equipment than the usual rocket launchers and AK-47s in the traditional black market. These digital black markets are also allowing terrorist organizations from Iraq, Syria, Libya and Yemen, as well as self-radicalized individuals in the West, to access a larger assortment of arms, explosives material and expertise from the comfort and anonymity of their home computers.