DHS’s cyber workers; deporting legal immigrants; Nazi on Illinois ballot, and more | Homeland Security Newswire

Our picksDHS’s cyber workers; deporting legal immigrants; Nazi on Illinois ballot, and more

Published 9 February 2018

· DHS needs more cybersecurity workers—it just doesn’t know where or what kind

· Trump could try to deport legal immigrants who get federal benefits

· ICE wants to be an intelligence agency under Trump

· FEMA contractor sent 50,000 meals to Puerto Rico instead of 30 million

· How a Nazi made the ballot in Illinois

· MPs attack U.S. technology companies over fake news

· The dark consequences of Poland’s new Holocaust law

· The war in Yemen and the making of a chaos state

· Audit: FEMA lacked controls on second look at Sandy claims

· Newly uncovered malware uses DNS requests to siphon credit card data

DHS needs more cybersecurity workers—it just doesn’t know where or what kind (Aaron Boyd, Defense One)
The government’s primary cybersecurity agency is missing congressional deadlines to identify and categorize its cyber workforce, a congressional watchdog said.

Trump could try to deport legal immigrants who get federal benefits (Ed Kilgore, New York Magazine)
The administration is considering an initiative that Trump may try to implement by executive order: new rules that can make use of a broad variety of public benefit programs grounds for not granting citizenship or actually being deported, even for people who follow all of the rules of legal immigration.

ICE wants to be an intelligence agency under Trump (Betsy Woodryff, Daily Beast)
Immigration enforcers have tried for years to get access to spy agency secrets. Civil libertarians call the prospect ‘frankly terrifying’—and a lot more realistic under Trump.

FEMA contractor sent 50,000 meals to Puerto Rico instead of 30 million (Brian Lisi, New York Daily News)
‘In Puerto Rico, it’s been four months and we still have 30% of our population without energy.’

How a Nazi made the ballot in Illinois (Elaine Godfrey, The Atlantic)
The strange candidacy of Arthur Jones points to failures of democratic safeguards on every level. The Illinois Republican Party is condemning the man poised to be its nominee for Congress in the state’s third congressional district as a Nazi. So how did he end up on the ballot? The answer points to failures of democratic safeguards on every level, from a state party unable to recruit an alternative candidate in a highly partisan district, to voters signing ballot-access petitions without paying much attention. But even if the final bulwark holds when voters go to the polls in November, those failures have already delivered Arthur Jones the thing he may want most—attention for his extremist views.

MPs attack U.S. technology companies over fake news (Katrina Manson and Aliya Ram, Financial Times)
British MPs on Thursday attacked Facebook, Google and Twitter in Washington over what the parliamentarians regard as failures by the tech giants to fully investigate Russian interference in the Brexit referendum and 2017 election

The dark consequences of Poland’s new Holocaust law (Rachel Donadio, The Atlantic)
The country is stifling open discussion of war crimes—and jeopardizing its own standing on the world stage.

The war in Yemen and the making of a chaos state (Ben Watson, Defense One)
Aid workers, journalists, and experts describe little-appreciated realities about a 1,000-day conflict and — just maybe — how to turn things around.

Audit: FEMA lacked controls on second look at Sandy claims (Zachary R. Dowdy, Newsday)
‘It is a farce that nearly 5 1/2 years after Sandy a significant number of victims have still not received their award.’

Newly uncovered malware uses DNS requests to siphon credit card data (Zaid Shoorbajee, Cyberscoop)
Researchers have discovered new malware that relies on a unique way to steal credit card information from point-of-sale systems.