Long Island hamlet weighs coastal retreat; violent extremism online; sunglasses that can recognize faces, and more | Homeland Security Newswire

Our picksLong Island hamlet weighs coastal retreat; violent extremism online; sunglasses that can recognize faces, and more

Published 12 February 2018

· Coastal retreat is a highlight of East Hampton hamlet study plans

· Pre-radicalization criminal activity is strongest predictor of post-radicalization violent extremism

· Marginalizing violent extremism online

· Hypocritic oath

· DHS secretary: Focus on the systemic cyber risks

· Chinese police are wearing sunglasses that can recognize faces

· Death by hacking is no longer a far-fetched idea

· Poland’s Holocaust denialism will come back to haunt it

· Web giant Cloudflare stores extreme neo-Nazi content on U.K. soil

· DFA proposes “floating” affordable housing for dilapidated Manhattan pier

Coastal retreat is a highlight of East Hampton hamlet study plans (Beth Young, East End Beacon)
Strategic retreat from the coastline in Montauk is one of the most notable components of a series of hamlet studies presented to the East Hampton Town Board Feb. 6. Peter Flinker of Dodson & Flinker planning consulting firm said: “It’s necessary to increase resiliency, with strategic retreat from areas that are going to be wiped out anyway.”

Pre-radicalization criminal activity is strongest predictor of post-radicalization violent extremism (Jessica Rivinius, START)
Individuals who engaged in non-violent or violent crime prior to radicalizing were 1.85 times more likely to engage in acts of violent extremism after radicalizing than were extremists without criminal histories, according to new analysis of START’s Profiles of Radicalization in the United States dataset. A new research brief includes an analysis of the likelihood of pre-radicalization criminality for U.S. extremists, a look at the pre-radicalization criminal behaviors that are most prevalent amongst extremists with criminal histories, and information on the average age of earliest criminal activity for non-violent and violent extremists.

Marginalizing violent extremism online (Audrey Alexander, William Braniff, Lawfare)
Those wishing to minimize extremist exploitation of technology can make the “marginalization strategy” the organizing principle of their efforts, availing a number of different actors a range of methods that complement the tactic of content removal.

Hypocritic oath (Annie Sparrow, Foreign Policy)
How WHO and other international agencies aid Assad’s war against Syria’s civilians.

DHS secretary: Focus on the systemic cyber risks (Mark Rockwell, FCW)
The Department of Homeland Security is working to keep foreign terrorists out of the U.S. through new, beefed-up vetting procedures at borders and overseas, but keeping out cyber attackers is a very different challenge, according to the agency’s top official.

Chinese police are wearing sunglasses that can recognize faces (Zheping Huang, Defense One)
The devices have already helped nab seven fugitives related to major criminal cases, and 26 others who were traveling with fake identities.

Death by hacking is no longer a far-fetched idea (Ben Grubb, Sydney Morning Herald)
With everything from cars to treadmills being connected online, security flaws and even unintentional glitches can be fatal.

Poland’s Holocaust denialism will come back to haunt it (Remi Adekoya, Foreign Policy)
Polish leaders thought peddling historical revisionism at home had no consequences; now, it could threaten two crucial alliances.

Web giant Cloudflare stores extreme neo-Nazi content on U.K. soil (Mark Townsend, Guardian)
U.K. urged to act against company that protects the websites of banned far-right groups

DFA proposes “floating” affordable housing for dilapidated Manhattan pier (Eleanor Gibson, Dezeen)
New York architecture studio DFA has imagined a series of latticed apartment towers for Manhattan’s Pier 40, which would be able to remain above water in the event of rising sea levels. DFA’s conceptual proposal involves constructing a complex of housing, recreational and commercial facilities on the square-shaped Pier 40. The structure extends 250 meters over the Hudson River and currently houses car parking facilities and a popular football field. The residences in the towers would be elevated 60 inches (1.5 meters) above expected storm surge levels as one of a series of ways to protect the complex from flooding caused by sea-level rise.