How to hack an election; cybersecurity and the international order; Russian trolls & the left, and more | Homeland Security Newswire

The Russia watch How to hack an election; cybersecurity and the international order; Russian trolls & the left, and more

Published 14 February 2018

· Trump has not asked us to stop Russian election meddling, intelligence chiefs testify

· Less whole, less free, less at peace: Whither America’s strategy for a post-Cold War Europe?

· Trump’s top intelligence officials contradict him on Russian meddling

· How to hack an election: An intelligence analysis

· WSJ’s Noonan: We need to start transitioning to paper ballots to combat Russian hacking

· State Department’s answer to Russian meddling is about to be funded

· NBC’s Jo Ling Kent explains how #ReleaseTheMemo was part of a Russian social media effort “to manipulate the conversation in American politics”

· Insiders at Facebook admit it took 6 months to discover Russian foreign intelligence attacks

· Russia’s clash with the West is about geography, not ideology

· #Electionwatch: RT y Sputnik hablan Español

· Malware attacks on Olympics could have come from Russia and North Korea, experts say

· Will #Russia interfere in the upcoming 2019 European elections?

· Did Russian trolls infect the left? And how much did it matter?

· Today’s revolution: Cybersecurity and the international order

· Former senior FBI official is leading BuzzFeed’s effort to verify Trump dossier

Trump has not asked us to stop Russian election meddling, intelligence chiefs testify (Patrick Tucker, Defense One)
The intelligence community agrees Russia will try to influence the 2018 midterms, but they’re less clear on how to stop the Kremlin.

Less whole, less free, less at peace: Whither America’s strategy for a post-Cold War Europe? (James Goldgeiger, War on the Rocks)
In November 1999, when President Bill Clinton spoke at Georgetown University to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, he said that, “Now we are at the height of our power and prosperity.” After 40 years of containing communism during the Cold War, it seemed the first ten years after communist regimes began collapsing in Eastern Europe had gone about as well as they could. The idea that any country could challenge America’s global leadership was laughable. Europe seemed on its way to overcoming its historic divisions. Since then, however, America’s ability to promote the idea of a Europe whole, free, and at peace has eroded considerably. Authoritarian populism has surged in Central Europe. Russia has emerged as a power intent on undermining the Western order: It invaded Ukraine in 2014 and has launched information operations designed to disrupt electoral democracy across Europe and in the United States. And then came the election of Donald Trump, whose attitudes toward Europe have created tremendous uncertainty since he entered office.

Trump’s top intelligence officials contradict him on Russian meddling (Natasha Bertrand, The Atlantic)
The intelligence community has a stark warning about Russia’s intentions to interfere in the 2018 elections.

How to hack an election: An intelligence analysis
Yes, the Russians might have hijacked the 2016 election, and could do it again.

WSJ’s Noonan: We need to start transitioning to paper ballots to combat Russian hacking (Matt Vespa, Townhall)
No, we don’t need to go to paper ballots because we didn’t get hacked. The Wall Street Journal’s Peggy Noonan suggested on NBC’s Meet The Press over the weekend that we should start transitioning to paper ballots to avoid a possible partisan crackup in America if an election is contested based on such an event.