Our picksTsunami threat never ends; social media needs regulation; casualty drills, and more

Published 13 April 2018

· Tsunami threat never ends

· Lawmakers agree social media needs regulation, but say prompt federal action is unlikely

· Command and control: A fight for the future of government hacking

· Bombing Syria won’t stop Assad from using chemical weapons

· Pushing back Russia in the Middle East: A thought experiment

· Israel and Iran are headed for a collision in Syria

· Casualty drill means readying for the unthinkable

Tsunami threat never ends (Dan Nakaso, Honolulu Star-Advertiser)
‘Unlike hurricanes, a tsunami has no season. It can strike at any time, both day and night, without warning, or little warning.’

Lawmakers agree social media needs regulation, but say prompt federal action is unlikely (Craig Timberg, Tony Romm, and Elizabeth Dwoskin, Washington Post)
Two days of sharp questioning of Facebook chief executive Mark Zuckerberg underscored how the risks posed by social media have become areas of broad political concern, bringing together House and Senate, Democrat and Republican, even rural and urban lawmakers.

Command and control: A fight for the future of government hacking (Chris Bing, Cyberscoop)
Following years of effort and billions of dollars’ worth of research and planning, the nation finally has a fully operational force of cyberwarriors at U.S. Cyber Command. Yet, as those troops confront adversaries around the world, there’s uncertainty across government about how to best make use of them.

Bombing Syria won’t stop Assad from using chemical weapons (Alex Ward, Vox)
Assad’s forces launched more than 200 chemical attacks since the start of the war.

Pushing back Russia in the Middle East: A thought experiment (Daniel Byman, Lawfare)
Russia is increasingly emerging as an enemy of the United States, not just a rival. Although President Trump generally seems to oppose any attempt to confront Russia—with the exception of a tweet this morning in which he warned the Kremlin to “get ready”—it’s worth considering how a more strategically minded administration might do so, particularly in the Middle East, where Moscow has vastly expanded its influence.

Israel and Iran are headed for a collision in Syria (Avi Issacharoff, The Atlantic)
A new reality is taking shape as one war gives way to new ones.

Casualty drill means readying for the unthinkable (Lisa Trigg, The Tribune-Star, Terre Haute)
‘You can’t assume he’s dead. They are still a possible threat. That’s why we handcuffed him.’