China & U.S. technology; the golden age of armed robbery; privacy at the border, and more | Homeland Security Newswire

Our picksChina & U.S. technology; the golden age of armed robbery; privacy at the border, and more

Published 22 May 2018

  Spies are going after U.S. supply chains, intel agencies say

  How China acquires ‘the crown jewels’ of U.S. technology

  Summary: Fourth Circuit rejects suspicionless, forensic searches of devices at the border in United States v. Kolsuz

  The golden age of armed robbery

  Is Telegram secure? French terror arrest raises new questions about messaging app

  What to do after Santa Fe? Gov. Greg Abbott suggests metal detectors, mental screenings to protect schools

  Meet the Israeli company ready to sell citywide surveillance

  Police took 4 minutes to corner the Santa Fe shooter and 25 to capture him — here’s what we know about how the lengthy firefight went down

  In the Middle East, soon everyone will want the bomb

Spies are going after U.S. supply chains, intel agencies say (Patrick Tucker, Defense One)
As cyber defenses close the easier holes, foreign agents are looking to penetrate makers of parts and software.

How China acquires ‘the crown jewels’ of U.S. technology (Cory Bennett and Bryan Bender, Politico)
The U.S. fails to adequately police foreign deals for next-generation software that powers the military and American economic strength.

Summary: Fourth Circuit rejects suspicionless, forensic searches of devices at the border in United States v. Kolsuz (Grayson Clary, Lawfare)
When the Supreme Court rejected warrantless cell phone searches incident to arrest in Riley v. California, it emphasized that “many of the more than 90% of American adults who own a cell phone keep on their person a digital record of nearly every aspect of their lives,” and that “allowing the police to scrutinize such records on a routine basis is quite different from allowing them to search a personal item or two in the occasional case.” That powerful recognition of the privacy interests implicated by electronic devices promptly raised the question whether courts should rethink the way that other warrant exceptions apply to cell phones, laptops, and the like (the Ninth Circuit has since applied Riley to vehicle and probation searches). On May 9, in an important extension of the Supreme Court’s logic, the Fourth Circuit – in United States v. Kolsuz — ruled that authorities may no longer conduct forensic searches of electronic devices at the border without some degree of individualized suspicion.

The golden age of armed robbery (Michael Noble, Medium)
For a brief period in the late twentieth century, the figure of the armed bank robber was a staple of TV police dramas. Where did they go?

Is Telegram secure? French terror arrest raises new questions about messaging app (Patrick Tucker, Defense One)
It’s not clear that French police cracked the app’s encryption. But ISIS and other user groups are becoming wary.

What to do after Santa Fe? Gov. Greg Abbott suggests metal detectors, mental screenings to protect schools (Julieta Chiquillo and James Barragán, Dallas Morning News)
Abbott said schools should also consider screening the social media accounts of students for threats or troubling behavior.

Meet the Israeli company ready to sell citywide surveillance (Patrick Howell O’Neill, Cyberscoop)
Large public places, such as airports or shopping malls, have already been turned into surveillance free-for-alls, where people’s every move is catalogued for the sake of profit. Now, one prominent company is ready to help governments spread that same surveillance technology over entire cities.

Police took 4 minutes to corner the Santa Fe shooter and 25 to capture him — here’s what we know about how the lengthy firefight went down (Michelle Mark, Business Insider)
Two school resource officers have been hailed as heroes after they quickly confronted the suspected gunman who fatally shot 10 people at a Texas high school, and kept him isolated until he eventually surrendered, the Galveston County Sheriff said Monday.

In the Middle East, soon everyone will want the bomb (Henry Sokolsky, Foreign Policy)
The region is at risk of a nuclear arms race. Washington needs to stop proliferation before it starts.