Our picksAnti-vaxers & the next deadly pandemic; first Deepfakes political scandal; mobile devices as no phishing zones, and more

Published 10 July 2018

  Experts bet on first Deepfakes political scandal

  Modern solution, ancient problem: Measuring military effectiveness in the age of artificial intelligence

  DHS aims to turn mobile devices into no phishing zones

  As facial recognition use grows, so do privacy fears

  Kids learn about cybersecurity through gaming

  The full scale of Chicago’s gun violence

  Bigger, wetter, costlier: Studies suggest trend of slower, wetter hurricanes as county reviews lessons learned

  Anti-vaxxers are targeting a vaccine for a virus deadlier than Ebola

Experts bet on first Deepfakes political scandal (Jeremy Hsu, IEEE Spectrum)
Researchers wager on a possible Deepfake video scandal during the 2018 U.S. midterm elections

Modern solution, ancient problem: Measuring military effectiveness in the age of artificial intelligence (Brad DeWees, War on the Rocks)
A likely apocryphal exchange after the Vietnam War captured the problem of fighting without keeping effectiveness in mind: An American colonel tells a Vietnamese colonel, “You know, you never defeated us on the battlefield.” “That may be so,” replies the Vietnamese colonel, “but it is also irrelevant.” “What effect?” is a fundamental, though often overlooked, question in national security: What effect did an action have on an adversary, and did it bring us closer to our goals? This question can be asked about a foot patrol to greet local leaders, a bomb dropped on an insurgent position, a cyber operation to shut down an electric grid, or the awesome display of an aircraft carrier in plain sight of an adversary. The question applies equally to senior policymakers and to junior tacticians. Ignoring it at any level can have grave consequences, not least a tendency to win battles while losing wars.

DHS aims to turn mobile devices into no phishing zones (Frank Konkel, Defense One)
The Homeland Security Department and 16 other agencies are upgrading their mobile device security.

As facial recognition use grows, so do privacy fears (Rob Lever, AFP)
The unique features of your face can allow you to unlock your new iPhone, access your bank account or even “smile to pay” for some goods and services. The same technology, using algorithms generated by a facial scan, can allow law enforcement to find a wanted person in a crowd or match the image of someone in police custody to a database of known offenders. While most observers acknowledge the merits of some uses of this biometric identification, the technology evokes fears of a “Big Brother” surveillance state.

Kids learn about cybersecurity through gaming (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)
The third annual Livermore Library “Cyber Defense Challenge” took place at the Livermore Civic Center Library last week. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL) Computation employees and Cyber Defender summer interns volunteered their time to lead the exercise for community children in grades 6-12. While this is the third such event at the Livermore Library, it has been held in various other locations in the Tri-Valley area as well.

The full scale of Chicago’s gun violence (War is Boring)
In official numbers

Bigger, wetter, costlier: Studies suggest trend of slower, wetter hurricanes as county reviews lessons learned (Jared Keever, St. Augustine Record)
A June article in National Geographic cites two recent studies that suggest storms are moving more slowly and carrying more water and could continue to do so in the future.

Anti-vaxxers are targeting a vaccine for a virus deadlier than Ebola (Brendan Borrell, The Atlantic)
The vaccine for Hendra, a virus that can spread from horses to humans, has pitted owners against vets—revealing that science alone can’t prevent the next global pandemic.