The Russia watchMidterms cybersecurity as bad as 2016; Russian propaganda factory; anatomy of fake news, and more

Published 5 September 2018

·  I’m teaching email security to Democratic campaigns. It’s as bad as 2016.

·  The real reason Russia is rooting for Republicans in the midterms

·  Inside look at the Russian propaganda factory as it operates in Estonia

·  Russian propaganda in Montenegro, Sweden, and Finland – and how they’re fighting back

·  The anatomy of fake news: Rise of the bots

·  “He can find a way to release those taxes”: How Andrew Cuomo and the Empire State could terrorize Trump

·  How Robert Mueller outfoxed Donald Trump

·  How to spot a bot

I’m teaching email security to Democratic campaigns. It’s as bad as 2016. (Maciej Ceglowski, Washington Post)
Someone — the government or Silicon Valley — needs to step in to help.

The real reason Russia is rooting for Republicans in the midterms (Julia Davis, Daily Beast)
State-controlled media joke about abetting Trump and believe his tough talk on sanctions is just a ploy. If the Republicans win the midterms, they say, he’ll come around.

Inside look at the Russian propaganda factory as it operates in Estonia (ERR.ee)
A 2016 arrest by Estonian intelligence agents of a 55-year-old citizen of the Russian Federation led to the discovery of a whole trail of electronic communications, giving us a glimpse of just how Russian Federation-funded sites, masquerading as news, operate as well as some of the figures involved in their finance.

Russian propaganda in Montenegro, Sweden, and Finland – and how they’re fighting back (EuroMaidanPress) Unlike other parts of the world, the Russian state-run channel Sputnik didn’t survive long in the Nordic countries. Its only Nordic outlet, in Sweden, lasted less than a year before it shut down.
However, Sweden didn’t fall off the Russian radar after the failure of Sputnik and Russian mass media continued spreading disinformation about the Nordic country.

The anatomy of fake news: Rise of the bots (Raj Samani, Helpnetsecurity)
Spreading misinformation has become a mainstream topic to the extent that even the term ‘Twitter bot’ is a well-recognized term establishing itself into the modern lexicon. Whilst the term is well known, it can be argued that the development and inner workings of Twitter bots are less well understood.

“He can find a way to release those taxes”: How Andrew Cuomo and the Empire State could terrorize Trump (Chris Smith, Vanity Fair)
In a turn that is as much karmic as it is geographic, New York’s state attorney general, prosecutors for the Southern District, and Governor Andrew Cuomo are all pursuing investigations that could complement or outlast Mueller.

How Robert Mueller outfoxed Donald Trump (Michael Wolraich, Daily Beast)
The special prosecutor quietly and subtly played the president, who even now has no real clue what Mueller and his zipped-lipped crew are up to.

How to spot a bot (Derek B. Johnson, FCW) Congress, federal agencies and the American electorate have spent much of the past two years grappling with how to respond to a series of Russian-directed online influence campaigns on social media platforms.
Now, a new report provides a deep dive into the behavior and strategies that guide botnet-directed influence campaigns.