Our picksReplacing outdated bioterror-detection system; national data privacy law; the intelligence community & AI, and more

Published 28 September 2018

·  DHS aims to replace slow, outdated bioterror-detection system

·  Lie detectors: Why they don’t work, and why police use them anyway

·  Hurricane Florence: Environmental woes follow storm’s floodwaters

·  What will a national data privacy law look like?

·  Trump versus the killer asteroids

·  In cyberspace, governments don’t know how to count

·  How to stay safe around polluted floodwaters, beaches

·  How the intelligence community plans to use AI

DHS aims to replace slow, outdated bioterror-detection system (Patrick Tucker, Defense One)
A new plan to draw on big data and distributed sensors will replace a 2003 system that can take up to 39 hours to detect a threat.

Lie detectors: Why they don’t work, and why police use them anyway (Joseph Stromberg, Vox)
The FBI gives a polygraph test to every single person who’s considered for a job there. When the DEA, CIA, and other agencies are taken into account, about 70,000 people a year submit to polygraphs while seeking security clearances and jobs with the federal government.
Polygraphs are also regularly used by law enforcement when interrogating suspects. In some places, they’re used to monitor the activities of sex offenders on probation, and some judges have recently permitted plea bargains that hinge on the results of defendants’ polygraph tests.
Here’s what makes this all so baffling: The question of whether polygraphs are a good way to figure out whether someone is lying was settled long ago. They aren’t.

Hurricane Florence: Environmental woes follow storm’s floodwaters (Adam Wagner, Star-News, Wilmington, N.C.)
From fish kills to water quality conditions to sewer spills, there have been issues cropping up nearly daily.

What will a national data privacy law look like? (Chase Gunter, FCW)
Lawmakers and industry increasingly support a federal data privacy law, but the devil is in the details.

Trump versus the killer asteroids (Bryan Bender, Politico)
A new fiscal year begins Monday, but lawmakers have yet to pass the specific spending bill that would boost NASA’s asteroid defense plans.

In cyberspace, governments don’t know how to count (Stefan Soesanto, Defense One)
NATO’s governments can’t agree on what constitutes a cyber attack, and that’s a big problem.

How to stay safe around polluted floodwaters, beaches (Adam Wagner, Star-News, Wilmington, N.C.)
New Hanover County, N.C., officials warned residents to avoid floodwaters due to the possibility of infection-causing bacteria and other environmental risks present.

How the intelligence community plans to use AI (Phil Goldstein, FedTech)
Intelligence agency leaders see artificial intelligence as a tool to augment the capabilities of human analysts, not as a replacement for them.