Our picksDisinformation is the new normal; paperless immigration process; illegal weak passwords, and more

Published 11 October 2018

·  Disinformation is the new normal

·  DHS Digital Service is taking paper out of the immigration process

·  “Mandatory detentions” of immigrants at stake in Justice Kavanaugh’s first big case

·  Microsoft yanked Windows 10 Update after it reportedly deleted users’ files

·  President Trump just signed a law that radically changes life for airline passengers, flight attendants, and airlines

·  In California, it’s going to be illegal to make routers with weak passwords

·  Many of the U.S. military’s newest weapons have major cyber vulnerabilities: GAO

·  The White House National Cyber Strategy: Continuity with a hint of hyperbole

 

Disinformation is the new normal (Ben Collins, Daily Beast)
The Daily Beast was one of the first to cover the weirdness of hostile foreign entities posing as human actors on social media. It’s a beat that’s not going away anytime soon.

DHS Digital Service is taking paper out of the immigration process (Jack Corrigan, Nextgov)
The Digital Service works side by side with agency employees to tackle some of their most backlogged processes.

Mandatory detentions” of immigrants at stake in Justice Kavanaugh’s first big case (Scott Bixby, Daily Beast)
The ACLU calls the law a “draconian response to an imaginary problem,” while Republicans argue the government needs “broad power to detain.”

Microsoft yanked Windows 10 Update after it reportedly deleted users’ files (Ms. Smith, CSO)
Microsoft yanked Windows 10 Update for deleting users’ files. U.S. companies hotly deny there were Chinese spy chips in motherboards of their servers and the Justice Department indicted 7 Fancy Bear hackers.

President Trump just signed a law that radically changes life for airline passengers, flight attendants, and airlines (almost nobody even noticed) (Bill Murphy Jr., Inc.)
In the middle of the Supreme Court fight, the White House held a Friday afternoon signing ceremony for this giant, 1,200-page new law.

In California, it’s going to be illegal to make routers with weak passwords (Dave Gershgorn, Nextgov)
The range of devices that the law covers is incredibly broad.

Many of the U.S. military’s newest weapons have major cyber vulnerabilities: GAO (Patrick Tucker, Defense One)
Testers achieved access with simple tools, default passwords, and long lists of known-yet-unfixed vulnerabilities.

The White House National Cyber Strategy: Continuity with a hint of hyperbole (Alex Grigsby, Defense One)
There seems to be a general consensus that the new cyber strategy is a continuation of existing policy. However, the us-versus-them approach the strategy takes could pose a problem.