Our picksDHS misleading border info; Iran’s cyberattacks plan; Calif.’s fire-spotting cameras, and more

Published 9 January 2019

·  Online disinformation isn’t just for Russia anymore

  DHS accused of lying, again, about a terrorism-immigration link

·  How salmonella-tainted food gets into your fridge

·  Report: Iran is likely setting stage for international phishing campaign

·  Arizona drought-plan issues remain as federal Jan. 31 deadline nears

·  The American public is already worried about AI catastrophe

·  Gov. Gavin Newsom wants fire-spotting cameras in California fForests — and a lot more

·  At border, Homeland Security Department stats paint complex situation

·  Rep. Steve King wonders how the phrase “white supremacist” became “offensive”

Online disinformation isn’t just for Russia anymore (L. A. Times Editorial Board)
With the conspicuous exception of President Trump and some of his supporters, Americans were appalled when it was revealed that Russian “troll farms” had launched a disinformation campaign on social media designed to influence the 2016 election. But online deception about elections is detestable even when it originates inside this country, as it apparently did in a 2017 special election for a U.S. Senate seat from Alabama.

DHS accused of lying, again, about a terrorism-immigration link (Spencer Ackerman, Daily Beast)
Homeland Security recently tried to lay out the ‘facts’ behind suspected terrorists entering the U.S. Three legal-rights groups say DHS violated a key data-integrity law.

How salmonella-tainted food gets into your fridge (Madeline Marshall, Vox)
The USDA knows it’s there.

Report: Iran is likely setting stage for international phishing campaign (Patrick Tucker, Defense One)
Hackers have been methodically gaining access to domain name services that allow malware-laden emails to look like they come from legitimate organizations.

Arizona drought-plan issues remain as federal Jan. 31 deadline nears (The Arizona Daily Star)
Farmers, developers and officials of the $4 billion Central Arizona Project said they still aren’t satisfied with various provisions in a proposed drought contingency plan aimed at propping up imperiled Lake Mead.

The American public is already worried about AI catastrophe (Kelsey Piper. Vox)
A new report suggests that we expect big advances in software capabilities — and we’re nervous.

Gov. Gavin Newsom wants fire-spotting cameras in California fForests — and a lot more (Dale Kasler, The Sacramento Bee)
Appearing at a Cal Fire station on his first full day in office, Newsom said the new funding would come on top of $200 million already earmarked for forestry management by the Legislature last fall, bringing the total to $305 million in new spending.

At border, Homeland Security Department stats paint complex situation (Camila DeChalus, Roll Call)
White House says crisis is brewing, but apprehensions have declined, assets slowly built up

Rep. Steve King wonders how the phrase “white supremacist” became “offensive” (Zack Beauchamp, Vox)
Yes, this is a sitting member of Congress.