Our picksStolen CBP photos; AI & disinformation; migrant detention centers, and more

Published 11 June 2019

·  The Mueller Report sounded the alarm on election attacks. Will Congress act?

·  Judge: FBI must reveal some redacted portions of James Comey memos

·  White House blocks testimony on climate change for not following administration’s views

·  CBP says thousands of traveler photos stolen in “malicious cyber-attack”

·  New video editing technology raises disinformation worries

·  How AI could be weaponized to spread disinformation

·  Inside the horrors of migrant detention centers

The Mueller Report sounded the alarm on election attacks. Will Congress act? (Editorial Board, New York Times)
Beyond his findings of presidential misconduct, the special counsel made it clear that lawmakers cannot ignore the ongoing risk to the nation.

Judge: FBI must reveal some redacted portions of James Comey memos (Julia Arciga, Daily Beast)
A federal judge ruled Friday that the FBI must unredact some portions of former FBI director James Comey’s memos about his meetings with President Trump, CNN reports. The ruling reportedly permits the names of countries and world leaders brought up in conversations between Trump and Comey to be revealed. Judge James Boasberg said the FBI did not make a strong enough case for why the redactions of countries and names threatened national security, though he let one redaction of Trump talking negatively about a certain country remain. In the memos, Comey reportedly recalled Trump explaining to him why he was concerned about his then-national security adviser Michael Flynn and expressing his “dismay” of how Flynn handled scheduling calls with world leaders. Flynn is currently awaiting sentencing after he was found guilty of one count of lying to federal investigators about his conversations with Russian officials.

White House blocks testimony on climate change for not following administration’s views (Orion Rummler, Axios)
The White House stopped State Department intelligence analyst Rod Schoonover from providing written testimony on climate change this week, because “the science did not match the Trump administration’s views,” the New York Times reports. Among other complaints from the National Security Council, the final basis for blocking Schoonover’s testimony was to eliminate 5 scientifically-based pages that “described the various national security threats linked to climate change, like instability from water shortages in some parts of the world,” per the NYT.

I have never heard of basic facts being deleted from or blocked from testimony,” Norman J. Ornstein, a resident scholar at the conservative American Enterprise Institute, told the NYT.

CBP says thousands of traveler photos stolen in “malicious cyber-attack” (Jack Corrigan, Defense One)
The breach happened at one of the agency’s subcontractors and didn’t involve any data collected under its facial recognition program, officials said.

New video editing technology raises disinformation worries (Cat Zakrzewski, Washington Post)
A new algorithm developed by Stanford University engineers is putting the spotlight on advances in video editing that could make it more difficult to separate fact from fiction online.

How AI could be weaponized to spread disinformation (Cade Metz and Scott Blumenthal, New York Times)
In 2017, an online disinformation campaign spread against the “White Helmets,” claiming that the group of aid volunteers was serving as an arm of Western governments to sow unrest in Syria.
This false information was convincing. But the Russian organization behind the campaign ultimately gave itself away because it repeated the same text across many different fake news sites.
Now, researchers at the world’s top artificial intelligence labs are honing technology that can mimic how humans write, which could potentially help disinformation campaigns go undetected by generating huge amounts of subtly different messages.

Inside the horrors of migrant detention centers (Stef W. Kight, Axios)
This week, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) watchdog released two reports detailing the dangerous and concerning treatment of migrants in immigration detention spaces.