• Secrets of bubonic plague bacteria's virulence revealed

    Bubonic plague has killed more than 200 million people during the course of history and is thus the most devastating acute infectious disease known to man; scientists are closer to understanding bacteria’s virulence

  • National level exercise begins In May

    The National Exercise Program (NEP) of FEMA will conduct National Level Exercise 2-08 (NLE 2-08) — a combined functional and full scale exercise — from 1 through 8 May

  • South Korean avian flu situation worsens

    In less than two weeks, South Korea has confirmed eleven cases of the deadly H5N1 strain, which had been contained in the southwest of the country, some 200 miles south of Seoul

  • Government admits accidents at Plum Island biolab

    The biolab on Plum Island, off the tip of Long Island, is the only lab allowed to do research on the highly contagious foot-and-mouth disease; DHS officials admit that since 1978 here have been several accidental releases of the virus into cattle in holding pens

  • New way to estimate size and frequency of meteorite impacts

    How large was the meteorite which hit Earth 65 million years ago, leading to the extinction of the dinosaurs? Now we know: Four to six kilometers in diameter; scientists offer new methods to measure the size and frequency of meteorite impact

  • Researchers develop nasal anthrax vaccine

    Current FDA-approved vaccine is given as an injection and must be administered in three doses, scheduled two weeks apart; then, to remain effective, booster shots must be given at six, twelve, and eighteen months, and then again each year after for maximum protection; University of Rochester researchers “detoxify” the one of the three toxic proteins of anthrax in an effort to simplify vaccination process

  • Japanese firms to begin IT security rating

    Eighteen Japanese firms announced they were creating the world’s first ratings agency looking at data security, which they said was a rising concern for companies

  • Underwater ears offer information about hurricane strength

    MIT researchers find that hydrophones planted on the ocean floor can “listen” to hurricanes as they form; the sound hurricanes make varies with their intensity — so early listening to hurricanes would help first responders better prepare

  • Anxiety: Human-to-human bird flu infection in China

    A 24-year old man in China probably infected his father with the H5N1 strain of bird flu before dying, renewing concerns that the disease may soon spread easily among humans

  • SyTech Corporation and communication interoperability, I

    The lack of communication interoperability among first response, rescue teams, and law enforcement during the 9/11 attacks and Hurricane Katrina was only the most dramatic and poignant demonstration of a persistent and debilitating flaw in U.S. agencies’ planning for disaster — and performing during disaster; communication interoperability is essential not only in disasters, but for routine, every-day operations of law enforcement; SyTech’s comprehensive approach to interoperability offers a solution

  • Cisco shows Cisco Open Platform for Safety and Security

    New solution facilitates business continuity and force protection mission alike; in addition to incorporating Cisco’s own surveillance and network security technologies, new solution supports sensor integration and management, video analytics, geographic information system (GIS) framework for common operating picture, enterprise mass emergency notification, and physical access control

  • BCI offers stand-alone continuity credentials

    New entrants to the business continuity arena may have knowledge and understanding of the topic, but lack the experience required for full Business Continuity Institute membership; BCI offers a solution

  • Hardware failure biggest threat to business continuity

    Hardware failure was the top disruption threat to U.K. business operations in 2007; lessons of the 2007 floods are yet to be absorbed

  • TeleContinuity granted Type II carrier license in Japan

    Japan is earthquake prone, so Japanese companies and organizations are especially interested in business continuity and disaster recovery solutions; one innovative communication continuity solution comes from TeleContinuity, and the prediction here is that the Type II carrier license, and a good distribution agreement with ECOSS Japan, would make the company’s products a success in the not-always-easy-to-penetrate Japanese market

  • Insiders are the greatest threat to companies' security

    There is a 72 percent likelihood that the next successful attack on your company will come from an insider, says IBM Tivoli executive