• U.S. Animal Industries Pose Serious Risk of Future Zoonotic Pandemics

    Animal industries in the United States pose serious risk of future pandemics and the U.S. government lacks a comprehensive strategy to address these threats, a new study concludes. The study is the first to comprehensively map networks of animal commerce that fuel zoonotic disease risk in the U.S.

  • Stressed for a Bit? Then Don’t Click It, Cybersecurity Experts Advise

    Workers feeling a specific form of stress are more likely than others to become the victims of a phishing attack. Phishing psychology study explores what makes workers vulnerable.

  • How Secure Are Voice Authentication Systems Really?

    Voice authentication has increasingly been used in remote banking, call centers and other security-critical scenarios. Attackers can break voice authentication with up to 99 percent success within six tries.

  • U.S. Agencies Buy Vast Quantities of Personal Information on the Open Market – a Legal Scholar Explains Why and What It Means for Privacy in the Age of AI

    The issues pf the protection of personal information in the digital age is increasingly urgent. Today’s commercially available information, coupled with the now-ubiquitous decision-making artificial intelligence and generative AI like ChatGPT, significantly increases the threat to privacy and civil liberties by giving the government access to sensitive personal information beyond even what it could collect through court-authorized surveillance.

  • As Cybercrime Evolves, Organizational Resilience Demands a Mindset Shift

    Facing the threat of state-sponsored cyberattack groups, the financial motivations of organized cybercrime gangs and the reckless ambitions of loosely knit hacktivist collectives, organizations are fighting a cybersecurity battle on multiple fronts.

  • Opportunities for Australia–ASEAN Collaboration on Critical Minerals

    Southeast Asia’s energy transition is coming to life as the development of green technologies accelerates across the region. Securing critical minerals will be crucial to this process, and Australia should work with Southeast Asia to realize their mutual goals in this area.

  • China-Based Chemical Manufacturing Companies Charged, Executives Arrested in Fentanyl Manufacturing

    DOJ announced the arrest of two individuals and the unsealing of three indictments in the Southern and Eastern Districts of New York charging China-based companies and their employees with crimes related to fentanyl production, distribution, and sales resulting from precursor chemicals.

  • To Pay or Not to Pay? Ransomware Attacks Are the New Kidnapping

    Over the past several years, ransomware attacks have become a persistent national security threat. The inability to respond effectively to this challenge has normalized what should be intolerable: organized cybercriminals harbored by hostile states regularly disrupting and extorting businesses and essential services, causing misery in the process.

  • U.S. Policymakers Acting to Bolster Drug Supply Chains Amid Critical Shortages

    Alarmed by persistent shortages of critically important drugs such as cancer medications, Adderall, and antibiotics, U.S. policymakers are taking steps to shore up the country’s pharmaceutical supply chains. The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists has more than 900 drug and dose shortages on its drug shortage list, and the FDA lists more than 200. The number and length of supply disruptions has grown over the last 10 years.

  • Germany Reforms Immigration Law to Attract and Retain Skilled Workers

    From healthcare to IT, carpenters to technicians, Germany’s “help wanted” sign is blinking red. Germany has two million jobs to fill, and it needs 400,000 foreign workers to make up the shortfall every year. When the baby boomers retire en masse, the problem will only get worse. Now Germany is reforming its immigration laws to help close the gap, and bring in, and keep, foreign talent.

  • Rare Earth Elements in Turkey: Emerging Prospects

    Turkey discovered the world’s second-largest deposit of rare earth elements (REEs) in 2022, with an estimated reserve size of 694 million tons, making it the world’s second largest REEs deposit after China’s reserves of 800 million tons. China accounts for 60 percent of the worldwide REEs mined production, 85 percent of the world’s REEs processing capacity, and 90 percent share of the manufacturing of high-strength rare earth permanent magnets.

  • Scientific and Technological Flows Between the United States and China

    What are the potential benefits and risks of U.S.-Chinese scientific research collaboration? What is the nature and volume of scientific researcher flows between the United States and China? What potential threats and benefits have emerged from the recent uptick in scientific collaboration between the United States and China on aerospace engineering research?

  • As California Attempts a “Managed Retreat,” Coastal Homeowners Sue to Stay

    “Managed retreat” is a climate adaptation policy that calls for relocating and removing coastal structures rather than protecting them where they are. Experts say managed retreat is an important last-resort option for adapting to climate change, but California’s early attempts to implement the policy have provoked a backlash from homeowners and politicians.

  • State Farm’s California Pullout: What It Means for Climate Adaptation and Communities

    State Farm recently announced that it will no longer be offering new insurance policies to homeowners in California. The company made it clear that it no longer made financial sense to continue covering properties in the state due to its growing risk of wildfires, in addition to other challenges. State Farm is not alone in its departure; nor is California the only state in the red zone. As climate change magnifies the risks and impacts of disasters like wildfires, hurricanes, and floods, the insurance industry is being forced to shift strategies.

  • Why Do We Believe Compulsive Liars? What Makes Them Tick?

    One of the fascinating aspects concerning the saga of convicted entrepreneur Elizabeth Holmes and recently indicted New York Congressman George Santos is how long they got away with lying to investors, patients, voters, and the public. Given the sheer number of prevarications each of them employed, shouldn’t observers, even casual ones, have caught on to them sooner?