• MIGRANTS
    Julia H. Kaufman and Shelly Culbertson

    Sudden influxes of migrants across the U.S. southwest border are not new, but they are also increasing. Immigration relocation policies are likely one of the best ways to address migrant surges if done in a more organized, humane, and thoughtful way instead of as political theater.

  • IMMIGRATION
    Helen Whittle

    Attacks on police and emergency services during the New Year’s Eve celebrations in ethnically diverse urban areas across Germany have given rise to a new immigration debate.

  • BORDER SECURITY
    Aline Barros

    President Joe Biden announced Thursday measures to crack down on migrants seeking to enter the United States without authorization. The measures will make it easier for border authorities to quickly expel migrants who enter the U.S. between legal crossing points and revive country agreements where would-be asylum-seekers, who passed through a third country, must show they failed to receive protections there before asking for asylum at the U.S.-Mexico border.

  • BORDER SECURITY
    Uriel J. García and Alexa Ura

    The court ordered the Biden administration to continue enforcing the policy while Texas and other states that want to keep the Trump-era rule in place prepare their legal arguments.

  • BORDER SECURITY
    Corrie Boudreaux

    Over the weekend, U.S. immigration officials processed and released more than 1,700 migrants into El Paso, overwhelming local shelters.

  • BORDERS
    Jeff Seldin

    America’s borders – and borders in general – are no longer sufficient to help protect the United States from a variety of evolving threats, including foreign wars, according to a grim assessment by DHS secretary Alejandro Mayorkas.

  • IMMIGRATION
    Edward Alden

    The United States is relying on its engineering and science talent to stay ahead of China in what has become an existential struggle to lead in the industries of the future. At U.S. universities, international students make up 74 percent of graduate electrical engineering students, 72 percent of computer and information science students, and half or more students in pharmaceutical sciences, mathematics, and statistics. Yet, the U.S. Congress has not revised immigration quotas since 1965, when the U.S. population was almost 140 million people smaller. Nor has Congress revisited the rules for highly educated immigrants since 1990—which was before the U.S. information technology sector created millions of new jobs in technical fields that have attracted so many immigrant scientists and engineers.

  • BORDER SECURITY
    Kira Schacht

    Though the top EU court recently ruled that Germany, Denmark and other Schengen states have no legal basis for extending border checks reimposed in 2015, the European Commission is not initiating infringement procedures.

  • IMMIGRATION
    Aline Barros

    Despite the record influx of migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border and a shortage of workers in the United States, experts believe immigration policy will remain unchanged after the midterm elections.

  • IMMIGRATION & CRIME
    Sean Kennedy, Jason Richwine, and Steven A. Camarota

    Activists and academics have been misusing data from the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) in studies when claiming that illegal immigrants have relatively low crime rates. These studies fail to appreciate the fact that it can take years for Texas to identify convicts, while they are in custody, as illegal immigrants. These studies thus misclassify as native-born a significant number of offenders who are later identified as illegal immigrants.

  • IMMIGRATION
    Gil Guerra

    The second round Brazil’s presidential election, to be held 30 October, might plunge the highly polarized country into a political chaos. One side-effect would be the mass migration of Brazilians fleeing instability, exacerbating the hectic state of migration at the U.S. southern border. Brazilian migrants will join the growing number of migrants from Colombia, Ecuador, and Venezuela in reshaping migration trends.

  • IMMIGRATION
    David J. Bier

    Conventional wisdom holds that the U.S. immigration system is broken – but the issue is not who should be admitted legally, for how long, and what about their families. Rather, a defining way in which the system is broken is that the current system is unable to implement the policies that Congress and the administration have already chosen. This article summarizes the basic facts about the immigration backlogs, which comprise roughly 24 million cases across the U.S. government.

  • ASYLUM
    Elizabeth Jacobs

    The U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) recently canceled reforms made in 2020 to modernize the asylum system. DHS should have at least considered lawful alternatives before revoking.

  • H-2B VISAS
    David J. Bier

    The H 2B program allows employers to hire foreign workers for seasonal or temporary nonfarm jobs. USCIS recently announced that employers had already reached the H 2B cap of 33,000 visas for the winter months before the start of the season. The H 2B program is filling jobs in relatively niche areas or positions where the shortages are most severe. DHS should immediately raise the cap to allow more H 2B workers to enter these positions.

  • HUMAN TRAFFICKING
    Cezary Podkul, with Cindy Liu

    Tens of thousands of people from across Asia have been coerced into defrauding people in America and around the world out of millions of dollars. Those who resist face beatings, food deprivation or worse.

  • ARGUMENT: BORDER SECURITY

    The number of encounters with illegal immigrants recorded by the Border Patrol in FY2020 was 458,088. In FY22021, that number increased to about two million. The number of encounters with illegal immigrants who already had criminal records in FY2020 was 2,438. In FY2021, it rose to 10,763.

  • IMMIGRATION & INNOVATION
    Laura Taylor-Kale

    Immigration barriers for entrepreneurs and U.S.-educated STEM graduates hurt American innovation.

  • ILLEGAL MIGRANTS

    According to a new analysis by FAIR, a nonprofit organization calling for reducing overall immigration levels, the cost of providing for the needs of illegal aliens who entered the country under since January 2021 adds an additional $20.4 billion annually.

  • IMMIGRATION
    Jose Ivan Rodriguez-Sanchez

    The gap between the demand for labor and its supply was already forming in 2017. By July 2022, as the pandemic’s effects on the workplace were easing, the U.S. had 11.2 million job openings but only 5.7 million unemployed workers who might fill them. The trend that’s driving labor shortages: declining numbers of immigrants allowed to legally work in the U.S.

  • BORDER SECURITY

    U.S. Border Patrol agents in the El Paso Sector recently identified ten adults posing as unaccompanied minors while in custody. So far in FY 2022, nearly 700 adult migrants were discovered to be posing as minors.