• A Systems Approach to Cybersecurity

    The frequency and severity of cyberattacks on critical infrastructure is a subject of concern for many governments, as are the costs associated with cyber security, making the efficient allocation of resources paramount. A new study proposes a framework featuring a more holistic picture of the cyber security landscape, along with a model that explicitly represents multiple dimensions of the potential impacts of successful cyberattacks.

  • A War Within a War: Cyberattacks Signal a New Approach to Combat

    In addition to fighting with troops on the ground, Ukraine is also defending itself on another front, from cyberattack.

  • Cyberspace: The New Battleground in Modern-Day Warfare

    Twenty-first century battles are now being fought digitally, as well as with missiles on land, sea and air. Bolstering cybersecurity is thus becoming ever more important as nation states wage war in new and complex arenas.

  • Computer Security Researchers Aim to Prevent Tech Abuse

    Tech abuse often exists within a larger web of harm. Assailants can abuse their victims through tech including spyware, also known as stalkerware, and through inappropriate use of location-tracking features in phones and other devices. They harass their former partners on social media, hack into email accounts, and more. Researchers have created a new approach to helping survivors of domestic abuse stop assailants from hacking into their devices and social media to surveil, harass and hurt them.

  • Hacker Underground | Belarus to Join the Fight | Western Arms, and more

    Vladimir Putin accused of war crimes, while Belarus’s military is ready to join the war on Russia’s side. Ukraine hackers vow to stop Russia, as fears grow the Russia’s likely cyber attack on Ukraine will spill over into other countries.

  • Why Putin’s War with Ukraine Is a Miscalculation

    Putin’s invasion of Ukraine is a geopolitical earthquake that will cause repercussions far beyond Europe. But the Russian president might be planting the seeds for the demise of his regime by overreaching.

  • Wide Range of Possible Targets for Russian Cyberstrikes, from Infrastructure to Smartphones

    For years prior to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Vladimir Putin’s government waged cyberwar aimed at destabilizing the country’s infrastructure, government, and financial systems, including several distributed-denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks in the run-up to this week’s assault. What are Russia’s cyberwarfare capabilities, and what would a cyberattack against the U.S. look like?

  • The U.S. Digital Security Challenges: Q&A with Frederic Lemieux

    The U.S. is facing many digital challenges: Ransomware attacks; critical infrastructure vulnerability; exploitation of flaws in widely used software packages such as SolarWinds; potential Russian cyberattacks resulting from the Ukraine crisis; shortage of cybersecurity talent which leaves many government and private sector positions vacant; and many more. HSNW talked with Georgetown’s Professor Frederic Lemieux, a recognized expert in the fields of global threats and homeland security.

  • A Security Technique Fools Would-Be Cyber Attackers

    Multiple programs running on the same computer may not be able to directly access each other’s hidden information, but because they share the same memory hardware, their secrets could be stolen by a malicious program through a “memory timing side-channel attack.” Researchers demonstrate a method that safeguards a computer program’s secret information while enabling faster computation.

  • How AI Is Shaping the Cybersecurity Arms Race

    The average business receives 10,000 alerts every day from the various software tools it uses to monitor for intruders, malware and other threats. Dealing with this avalanche of alerts is achallenge which underscores the need for better ways to stem the tide of cyber-breaches.

  • What to Expect with Cyber Surprise

    The cyber domain has three critical characteristics which differentiate it from the kinetic domain: it is connected across the globe; it is pervasive in the economic life-blood of the world; and it is asymmetric in its ability to enable power projection. What, then, can we expect from a strategic surprise which we expect Russia to launch as part of its campaign in Ukraine? “We are about to see what war in the cyber era really looks like and, truthfully, nobody can tell you what will happen next,” Paul Rosenzweig writes.

  • There Is No Cyber “Shock and Awe”: Plausible Threats in the Ukraine Conflict

    People are talking about cyberwar again. Claims are made that any Russian military action in Ukraine will be preceded, accompanied by, and followed by devastating cyberattacks aimed at Ukraine and countries assisting Ukraine. Lennart Maschmeyer and Nadita Kostyuk write that “Cyber operations are not strategically irrelevant, nor are surprise cyber strikes of strategic relevance impossible. Rather, in assessing their threat we should distinguish what is possible in theory from what is feasible, and thus probable, in practice.”

  • New Cybersecurity Advisory: Protecting Cleared Defense Contractor Networks Against Russian Hackers

    Over the last two years, CISA, FBI and NSA continue observing regular targeting of both large and small Cleared Defense Contractors and subcontractors. Agencies strongly encourage organizations to apply recommended mitigation steps to reduce risk of compromise.

  • Possible Russian Cyberattacks Could Reverberate Globally: U.S., Allies

    The United States and its Western allies are bracing for the possibility that a Russian invasion of Ukraine would have a ripple effect in cyberspace, even if Western entities are not initially the intended target.

  • New Cybersecurity Advisory: Protecting Cleared Defense Contractor Networks Against Russian Hackers

    Over the last two years, CISA, FBI and NSA continue observing regular targeting of both large and small Cleared Defense Contractors and subcontractors. Agencies strongly encourage organizations to apply recommended mitigation steps to reduce risk of compromise.