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ImmigrationIdaho joins program connecting DMV information to E-Verify

Published 22 July 2013

Idaho became the third state to join the Records and Information from DMV’s for E-Verify (RIDE) program on Sunday. The other two states are Mississippi and Florida. RIDE automates motor vehicle document verification between Motor Vehicle Agencies (MVAs) and the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS).

Idaho became the third state to join the Records and Information from DMV’s for E-Verify (RIDE) program on Sunday. The other two states are Mississippi and Florida.

RIDE automates motor vehicle document verification between Motor Vehicle Agencies (MVAs) and the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). The program allows USCIS E-Verify employers to verify their new employee’s driver’s license, permit, or state-issued ID with the issuing U.S. jurisdiction. The E-Verify system verifies the data and responds to the E-Verify user whether the submitted information matches with the MVA data or not.

The American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA) notes that currently only government agencies and contractors are required to participate in E-Verify. When job seekers fill out the I-9 form they are required to supply a document that establishes identity and employment. Often applicants choose to provide a driver’s license, so the program is intended to make the E-Verify process more efficient.

The libertarian-leaning Cato Institute describes RIDE as a “new cardless national ID

Cato notes that Idaho rejected the REAL ID Act in 2007. The state’s House and Senate passed a resolution against what state lawmakers described as a move toward the creation of a national identification system, but in the years since the stance appears to have changed and the Idaho Transportation Department has now decided to support RIDE.

Randy Neal, an immigration lawyer in Idaho Falls, told local ABC affiliate KIDK3 that Idaho’s move to participate in RIDE makes sense logistically.

Idaho is a state that restricts driver’s licenses to individuals who have legal status,” said Neal. “So they’re in a better place I guess to be involved with this program.”

Some states issue driving privileges to individuals regardless of legal status. “So for those states it would not be particularly helpful,” said Neal.

Neal says the program is not aimed to detect individuals who are in the U.S. unlawfully.

It is a way for the employer to avoid civil and criminal liability by hiring individuals who are not eligible for employment in the United States,” said Neal.