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Our picksISIS foreign fighters; the era of digital conflict; White nationalism in the Trump era, and more

Published 21 August 2017

· Trial and terror
· What we still don’t know about the Islamic State’s foreign fighters
· Trump orders that US Cyber Command receive new authority to conduct cyberwarfare
· The era of digital conflict
· America’s weak cybersecurity puts our nation at risk of a modern 9/11
· Why the ACLU is adjusting its approach to “free speech” after Charlottesville
· Hate on the march: White nationalism in the Trump era
· How did Spain avoid terrorism before Barcelona?

Trial and terror (The Intercept)
The U.S. government has prosecuted 808 people for terrorism since the 9/11 attacks. Most of them never even got close to committing an act of violence.

What we still don’t know about the Islamic State’s foreign fighters (Graeme Wood, Atlantic)
The biggest concern is what happens when they come back home.

Trump orders that US Cyber Command receive new authority to conduct cyberwarfare (Chris Bing, CyberScoop)
President Donald Trump announced Friday that U.S. Cyber Command will be elevated to a unified combatant command, making it the 10th such organization with the operational authority to conduct military operations abroad under the purview of the secretary of Defense and the White House.

The era of digital conflict (David Shipley, CBC)
Cyberwar is rewriting the playbook for how countries fight each other and why we’re all in the crosshairs.

America’s weak cybersecurity puts our nation at risk of a modern 9/11 (Sandy Clark, The Hill)
As serious as Kim Jong Un’s threats are to attack Guam, Alaska or Hawaii with nuclear ballistic missiles, it’s likely that any future conflict will begin, and possibly end, with non-kinetic but no less crippling cyber warfare.

Why the ACLU is adjusting its approach to “free speech” after Charlottesville (Dara Lind, Vox)
The ACLU positioned itself to lead the resistance. Now its deepest traditions could be at stake.

Hate on the march: White nationalism in the Trump era (Reveal)
Why Charlottesville, Virginia, became a flashpoint, and whether more race-based clashes are on the way.

How did Spain avoid terrorism before Barcelona? (Krishnadev Calamur, The Atlantic)
After experiencing the worst jihadist attack anywhere in Europe in 2004, the country had seemed largely immune—until Thursday.