Our picksWorst 2018 cyber breaches; category 6 hurricane?; budgeting for more child separation, and more

Published 11 July 2018

  Defense contractor detained migrant kids in vacant Phoenix office building

  Trump’s Office of Refugee Resettlement is budgeting for a surge in child separations

  The worst cybersecurity breaches of 2018 so far

  The world’s worst industrial disaster is still unfolding

  America’s enduring failure to prevent food-borne illness

  The secret story of how America lost the drug war with the Taliban

  Why is Israel simulating attacks on its own nuclear reactors?

  The world has never seen a category 6 hurricane, but the day may be coming

  Perspectives on dual use

Defense contractor detained migrant kids in vacant Phoenix office building (Aura Bogado, Ziva Branstetter, and Vanessa Swales, Reveal)
A major U.S. defense contractor quietly detained dozens of immigrant children inside a vacant Phoenix office building with dark windows, no kitchen and only a few toilets during three weeks of the Trump administration’s family separation effort, Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting has learned. Videos shot by an alarmed neighbor show children dressed in sweatsuits being led – one so young she was carried – into the 3,200-square-foot building in early June. The building is not licensed by Arizona to hold children, and the contractor, MVM Inc., hasclaimed publicly that it does not operate “shelters or any other type of housing” for children.

Trump’s Office of Refugee Resettlement is budgeting for a surge in child separations (Mark Joseph Stern, Slate)
The agency is planning to move funds for refugees and HIV/AIDS patients to cover the possible costs.

The worst cybersecurity breaches of 2018 so far (Lily Hay Newman, Wired)
Looking back at the first six months of 2018, there haven’t been as many government leaks and global ransomware attacks as there were by this time last year, but that’s pretty much where the good news ends. Corporate security isn’t getting better fast enough, critical infrastructure security hangs in the balance, and state-backed hackers from around the world are getting bolder and more sophisticated. Here are the big digital security dramas that have played out so far this year—and it’s only half over.

The world’s worst industrial disaster is still unfolding (Apoorva Mandavilli, The Atlantic)
In Bhopal, residents who survived the massive gas leak and those who arrived later continue to deal with the consequences.

America’s enduring failure to prevent food-borne illness (Emily Atkin, New Republic)
An E. coli outbreak linked to romaine lettuce killed five people this spring. What’s the government doing to prevent the next one?

The secret story of how America lost the drug war with the Taliban (Josh Meyer, Politico)
A high-stakes plan to indict Afghan drug lords and insurgency leaders on criminal conspiracy charges ran afoul of the Obama team. Five years later, it remains buried under Trump.

Why is Israel simulating attacks on its own nuclear reactors? (Zachary Keck, National Interest)
According reports, members of the Israel Atomic Energy Commission (IAEC) believe that a missile attack is the greatest danger to the reactors today.

The world has never seen a category 6 hurricane, but the day may be coming (David Fleshler, Sun Sentinel)
Some changes — such as the slowing of hurricanes’ forward motion and the worsening of storm surges from rising sea levels — are happening now.

Perspectives on dual use (Christine Uhlenhaut, OIE Bulletin)
The term ‘dual use’ has become a catchphrase for advances that can be used for good but also for malevolent purposes, including in the life sciences. Can security be ensured by regulation?