Our picksStateless Jihadists | Girding for Electronic Warfare | State Ransomware Threats, and more

Published 5 December 2019

·  Returning Home: Evaluating Statelessness among Former Jihadists

·  When Do Cyberattacks Deserve a Response from NATO?

·  How the Army Is Girding for Electronic Warfare

·  Killer Robo-Bees Show How the Sting of Disinformation Can Spread

·  GRADD to Be Pilot Agency for Infrastructure Disaster Mitigation Plan

·  A Year after the Big Quake, Many Alaska Lives Remain Shaken

·  A Year after the Big Quake, Many Alaska Lives Remain Shaken

·  DHS Official Briefs Senators on State Ransomware Threats in Classified Meeting

Returning Home: Evaluating Statelessness among Former Jihadists (Alessandra Restifo, FPRI)
When addressing the case of Hoda Muthana, an American-born former ISIS member, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo stated, “Ms. Hoda Muthana is not a U.S. citizen and will not be admitted into the United States… . She’s a terrorist.” The judge ultimately denied Muthana’s citizenship because her father held diplomatic immunity at the time of her birth, meaning she was ineligible for birthright citizenship. However, Pompeo’s statement summarizes the departure of U.S. repatriation policies from the due process and rehabilitation-based programs set by the Department of Justice (DOJ) and indicates new concerns in U.S. national security. Currently, the DOJ has processed seven cases of former ISIS returnees and estimates over 20 American fighters remain in Syria and Iraq. Analysis of changes in American foreign policy also indicates the threats that uninformed and hypocritical decisions regarding former jihadists and the Syria conflict as a whole have created a variety of potential threats to U.S. national security. By neglecting the importance of foreign relations in national security, American foreign policy decisions have damaged the reputation of the United States and reduced its presence in areas of international importance. Therefore, policy deciding the repatriation of former ISIS members and related issues must equally address U.S. military concerns and relations with international actors.

When Do Cyberattacks Deserve a Response from NATO? (Mark Pomerleau, FifthDomain)
What kind of cyberattack would trigger a response from NATO?
That question, on so called Article 5 intrusions, has intrigued cybersecurity experts since the organization declared cyberspace a domain of warfare in 2016. But a more immediate question may be how NATO and its member nations confront the daily cyber events that never rise to the threshold of armed attacks.

How the Army Is Girding for Electronic Warfare (Lauren C. Williams, FCW)
There’s no doubt that electronic warfare will become increasingly commonplace. That’s why the Army is vigorously testing its flying platforms, such as the Apache helicopter, to ensure they can withstand both current and evolving threats.

Killer Robo-Bees Show How the Sting of Disinformation Can Spread (Elise Thomas, The Strategist)
Investigations of influence operations and information warfare methodologies tend to focus heavily on the use of inauthentic social media activity and websites purpose built to propagate misinformation, disinformation and misleading narratives.
There are, however, a range of other methodologies that bad actors can exploit. One way in which obviously false content can be spread quickly, widely and easily across ‘junk news’ sites is through a syndicated press release.

GRADD to Be Pilot Agency for Infrastructure Disaster Mitigation Plan (James Mayse, Messenger-Inquirer)
The resiliency plan will focus on how critical infrastructure would continue to function post-disaster, e.g., the study could examine how a wastewater utility would continue operating if it lost its chlorine supplier.

A Year after the Big Quake, Many Alaska Lives Remain Shaken (Matt Tunseth, Zaz Hollander, ADN)
According to the state, more than 10,500 damage claims were filed with the federal government after the magnitude 7.1 quake in November 2018. One official estimates the total state and federal assistance will top $275 million.

DHS Official Briefs Senators on State Ransomware Threats in Classified Meeting (Sean Lyngaas and Benjamin Freed, Cyberscoop)
The head of the Department of Homeland Security’s cybersecurity division on Wednesday provided senators with a classified briefing on ransomware attacks, the latest indication of the threat the file-locking malware poses to state and local governments.