Cybersecurity

  • Vulnerability identified in Amazon's cloud computing

    Researchers show that it is possible to find would-be victims within cloud hardware; cloud technologies use virtual machines — remote versions of traditional onsite computer systems; the number of these virtual machines can be expanded or contracted on the fly to meet demand, creating tremendous efficiencies — but the actual computing is performed within one or more physical data centers, creating troubling vulnerabilities

  • How credible -- and serious -- is the cyber threat the U.S. faces?

    New report examines recent cyber attacks on South Korea and asks whether whether the attacks constituted an act of war and whether they could have been the work of a terrorist group; the answer is no on both counts; the U.S. dependence on digital technology makes it somewhat more vulnerable to cyber attacks than other nations,

  • The brief

    General IT spending by the U.S. government will increase by 3.5 percent a year between 2009 and 2014; during the same time, U.S. government spending on cybersecurity will grow at a compound rate of 8.1 percent a year, and spending on vendor-supplied information security products and services will increase from $7.9 billion in 2009 to $11.7 billion

  • Raytheon buys BBN for $350 million

    The latest example of traditional defense contractors expanding into the information systems sector is Raytheon’s acquisition of Massachusetts-based BBN, the company which put the “@” in e-mail addresses

  • NSA to build $1.5 billion cybersecurity center near Salt Lake City

    Facility will support Comprehensive National Cybersecurity Initiative; one goal of the new center will be to help federal agencies reduce government exposure to Internet-based threats by reducing and consolidating the number of external Internet connections across government

  • Tech projects to receive big chunk of second wave of stimulus spending

    Information technology projects will receive significant funds, implementation director says;

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  • New report says U.S. Air Force should prepare for cyberwar

    New Rand Corp. report argues that the U.S. military branches must treat cyberwar as another emerging field of battle — one that both amplifies the threat of physical combat and presents new tactical challenges unfamiliar to everyone, not just the armed forces

  • China bolsters its information warfare capabilities

    One of the chief strategies driving the process of modernization (known in China as “informatization”) in the PLA is the coordinated use of CNO, electronic warfare (EW), and kinetic strikes designed to
    strike an enemy’s networked information systems, creating “blind spots” that PLA forces could exploit at predetermined times or as the tactical situation warranted

  • Robust hierarchical metropolitan quantum cryptography network

    The security of a majority of classical cryptography is based on the complexity of the cipher algorithms and the development of distributed computing and specific hacking chips; this may no longer be sufficient, as quantum computing has become a serious threat to classical cryptography; the solution: quantum encryption

  • iPhones, social networking add to IT security woes

    The security staff at private and government organizations have new security problems to contend with: smartphones and social networking

  • UK.gov's G Cloud may have security silver lining after all

    Cloud computing offers many benefits, but enhanced security is not one of them — or is it? An expert says that the emergence of cloud computing is making it possible to take a new approach to security; until now, the U.K. government has kept its work on information security in specialist bodies such as GCHQ and CESG, separate from the development of business functions; “The cloud gives us the opportunity to get the specification right before we get too far down the track,” he says

  • The personal spy: the smartphone in your pocket may be spying on you, II

    The advances in smartphone technology could well be exploited in much the same way that e-mail and the Internet can be used to “phish” for personal information such as bank details

  • Growing demand for IT forensics experts

    As reliance on the Internet increases, so do Internet-related crimes; the growing need to investigate such crimes and find out the culprits and their methods has increased demand for IT forensics experts

  • The personal spy: the smartphone in your pocket may be spying on you, I

    The advances in smartphone technology could well be exploited in much the same way that e-mail and the Internet can be used to “phish” for personal information such as bank details

  • The Internet to be made more useful for the U.S. military

    DARPA awarded Lockheed Martin a $31 million contract to lead a team which will redesign the Internet to make it more suitable for military use