• Chinese cyber attacks hit U.S. law firm which is suing China for stealing Web filtering code form a U.S. company

    The Los Angeles-based law firm Gipson Hoffman & Pancione sued China for lifting Web-filtering code developed by U.S. company Cybersitter; Chinese companies and government agencies stole the code in order to use it in the Chinese government’s effort to create tighter Web censorship and tracking system (China’s Orwellian name for the project” “The Green Dam Youth Escort monitoring program”); on Monday, Chinese hackers began to hack the law firm’s computer systems, in a manner strikingly similar to the attacks by Chinese intelligence operatives on Google, Adobe Systems, and 32 other Western companies

  • China tries to contain damage from Google dispute

    The Chinese government says it will try to persuade Google to continue its operations in China, but expect Google – and other foreign companies — to “respect local law and regulations and local culture and customs to shoulder social responsibility”; Google already made concessions to Chinese law and regulations by allowing the government to dictate what users can – and cannot — find when they do Google searches; Google’s decision to leave China came after Chinese intelligence agents hacked the Gmail accounts of political dissidents and human rights activitists

  • Cyber exercise to target financial firms

    The test, which starts 9 February, will have different scenarios for each of four different types of businesses: Financial firms, retailers, card processors, and general businesses; on each day, participants will receive a description of a specific scenario for their category of business, building on the previous day

  • Iran-China cyberwar breaks out as Iranians hack into Chinese search engine

    Iranian hackers broke into the Web site of Baidu, the Chinese search engine, displaying the Iranian flag and calling themselves the Iranian Cyber Army; in retaliation, Chinese hackers flooded Iranian Web sites with warnings about intervention in China’s internal affairs

  • Google to pull out of China following government-sponsored cyberattacks

    In order to operate in China, Google agreed to implement stringent government-dictated censorship as to what Chinese consumers can – and cannot – find when doing Google searches; Google’s compliance with Chinese censorship was harshly criticized by human rights and freedom-of-speech organizations, but Google responded that this was the cost of doing business in China; the Chinese government’s hacking of Gmail accounts in order to monitor political dissidents proved to much for Google, though, and the company is now set to end its operations in China

  • Google’s decision a rare show of defiance in China

    Google’s decision to leave China is a rare show of defiance in a market where the government punishes those who do not play by the rules; in industries from automaking to fast food, companies have been forced to allow communist authorities to influence — and sometimes dictate — their choice of local partners, where to operate, and what products to sell; many high-tech companies operating in China are forced to open their intellectual property and industrial secrets to their Chinese competitors – or to Chinese government officials, who pass on that property to Chinese companies – allowing these Chinese companies to reverse engineer and copy Western companies’ products and solutions; Western companies have struggled to make headway against intense competition from Chinese rivals – rivals who enjoy the fact that the Chinese government writes rules which tilt the playing field in favor of Chinese companies

  • China offers Internet pirates bulletproof havens for illegal file sharing

    Most bulletproof hosts which allow music, video, and software to be illegally shared online are located in China, where criminals are able to take advantage of low costs and legal loopholes to avoid prosecution; despite officials in Beijing talking in tough terms about computer crime — hacking potentially carries a death sentence in China — the authorities rarely cooperate with other countries to take action against hi-tech criminals; as a result, just a handful of firms in China are responsible for hosting thousands of criminal enterprises online; one example: more than 22,000 Web sites which sent pharmaceutical spam were hosted by six bulletproof servers in China

  • Symantec issues South Africa cybercrime warning

    Crime is not new to South Africa, but cybercrime is; broadband rollouts and World Cup creating “perfect storm” for cyber criminals

  • 2010: Topics for homeland security discussion

    The only thing we can say for sure about 2010 is terrorists, criminals, and mother nature will surprise us at some point during 2010; still, based on what we do know, we offer a short list of topics we predict will dominate the homeland security discussion in the coming year – from whole-body scanners to 100 percent air cargo screening to social Web sites to communication interoperability to the consequences of climate change (or is there a climate change?)

  • Pentagon says U.S. fixed drones hacked by Iraqi insurgents

    Iraqi insurgents, using a $25.95 off-the-shelf commercial application, were able to intercept communication between U.S. surveillance UAVs and the UAVs’ command center; the hacking was discovered when the U.S. military found files of intercepted drone video feeds on laptops of captured militants; U.S. soldiers discovered “days and days and hours and hours of proof,” one U.S. officer said; the same hacking technique is known to have been employed in Afghanistan; the U.S. government has known about the UAV communication flaw since the 1990s, but assumed its adversaries would not be able to take advantage of it.

  • Adobe to patch zero-day Reader, Acrobat hole

    On 12 January Adobe will release patches to fix zero-day vulnerabilities in Reader and Acrobat; malicious Adobe Acrobat PDF files are distributed via an e-mail attachment that, when opened, executes a Trojan that targets Windows systems, according to Symantec; the rate of infection is extremely limited and the risk assessment level is very low, the company said.

  • Top 10 information security trends for 2010

    Further adoption of cloud, social media, and virtualization technologies will continue to blur the network parameter; organizations — large and small — should consider a layered, centralized security solution that provides multiple security touch points within the network, rather than around it

  • U.S. Army funds a new discipline: Network Science

    The U.S. Army gives Rensselaer Polytechnic in New York State $16.75 million to launch the Center for Social and Cognitive Networks; the new center will link together top social scientists, neuroscientists, and cognitive scientists with leading physicists, computer scientists, mathematicians, and engineers in the search to uncover, model, understand, and foresee the complex social interactions that take place in today’s society

  • GAO: U.S. unready to face growing cyber threats

    A GAO reports says that cyber-threats facing federal networks and the U.S. critical infrastructure are becoming increasingly sophisticated; the number of attacks is exponentially growing (security incidents grew “by over 200 percent from fiscal year 2006 to fiscal year 2008”), the report concludes that the United States is not optimally prepared to protect itself from such attacks

  • Raytheon-led team to provide the Pentagon with network-security early warning system

    A team including Raytheon, General Dynamics, SAIC, Eye Street Software, and BCMC receives a $28 million contract to provide the Pentagon with an early-warning system for defense against cyber attacks on military networks