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TerrorismU.S. agencies are still struggling with information sharing

Published 22 August 2011

It is nearly ten years since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and U.S. intelligence agencies are still struggling to strengthen the information sharing networks that proved broken that September day; according to the latest CRS report, “there remain many institutional and procedural issues that complicate cooperation between the two sets of agencies”

It is nearly ten years since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, and U.S. intelligence agencies are still struggling to strengthen the information sharing networks that proved broken that September day.

According to the latest report by the Congressional Research Service (CRS), “Counterterrorism requires the close coordination of intelligence and law enforcement agencies, but there remain many institutional and procedural issues that complicate cooperation between the two sets of agencies.”

The Hill reports that the 33-page overview of outstanding intelligence issues that Congress needs to address focuses on several key barriers that prevent the CIA, the FBI, the National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC), the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the National Security Agency (NSA), the Director of National Intelligence (DNI, and about a dozen other agencies and branches of the military from seamlessly gathering and sharing information about terrorists and their plots.

On 13 September, the House Intelligence Committee and Senate Intelligence Committee plan to hold a joint open hearing with the Director of National Intelligence James Clapper and a CIA officials to “examine evolution of threats against the U.S. and ways to further integrate the intelligence community.”