• Students of Nuclear Security Have a Problem. Here’s How to Help Them.

    Radioactive materials are attractive targets to thieves and other bad actors. These are rare finds, valuable on the black market and relatively easy to weaponize. New security professionals rarely learn practical skills for protecting these targets until they are on the job at nuclear power plants, research reactors, processing plants and other nuclear facilities.

  • Foreign Students Look Forward to Visa Stability

    International students in the U.S. whose studies and immigration status have undergone changes during President Donald Trump’s administration say they hope their stays will stabilize with President-elect Joe Biden.

  • Proposed Student Visa Policy Could Hinder U.S. Competitiveness

    In an effort to crack down on international students and scholars who overstay their visas, the administration is seeking to implement a new set of rules that would make it more difficult for them to remain in the U.S. One of the rules requires foreign students to leave the United States after two or four years, regardless of whether they have completed they degree or research work. The rule comes with a steep price tag. It would also undermine America’s interest in attracting talent from abroad and, ironically, it would do little to actually curtail the problem of visa overstays that it purports to solve.

  • UWF’s Master’s in Cybersecurity Online Program Ranks among Best Values in Nation

    In only its second year of existence, the University of Florida’s (UWF) nationally designated Master of Science in Cybersecurity online program – recognized as a leading program in cybersecurity education and workforce development — has been ranked as one of the best values in the nation, according to the 2020 Cybersecurity Guide rankings.

  • NSA Grant to Angelo State for Cyber Security Capacity Building Project

    Angelo State University has been awarded a $295,402 grant from the National Security Agency (NSA) to fund the new “ASU Cybersecurity Capacity Building Project” that will expand the cybersecurity program in ASU’s Department of Computer Science.

  • U.S. Revokes Visas of 1,000 Chinese Students Considered “High Risk”

    The U.S. says it has revoked the visas of more than 1,000 Chinese citizens considered “high risk” to U.S. security because of alleged ties with the Chinese military. The Trump administration has charged that Chinese students have come to the United States to steal intellectual property to advance China’s economic and military sectors.  

  • Can Anonymous Classrooms Protect Students from Beijing’s Snooping?

    With many American universities holding online courses this semester because of the pandemic, faculty members at Princeton, Harvard and other elite schools are looking for ways to protect the privacy and identity of students logging in from Hong Kong and China, where they are subject to China’s repressive rules on self-expression.  

  • Cybersecurity Research Center to Tackle Growing Cyberthreat

    RMIT University has launched Australia’s first cybersecurity research center which, RMIT says. “takes an industry driven approach to meet the rapidly evolving cyber security challenges in Australia and globally.” The center for Cyber Security Research and Innovation (CSRI) will focus on the organizational, human, and technical aspect of cyber security.

  • Idaho Team Impresses in Girls Go CyberStart Coding Competition

    It would have been a challenge even in normal times, but a four-girl team from Skyline High School in Idaho Falls overcame quarantine and equipment issues to finish 29th in Girls Go CyberStart, a national online problem solving competition held in late May.

  • UA Little Rock to Offer New Bachelor’s Degree in Cybersecurity

    The University of Arkansas at Little Rock is introducing a new four-year degree program in cybersecurity in the fall 2021 semester to help meet the rising demand for cybersecurity professionals. The university says the new degree program will attract more government and industry jobs to the region, while helping to fill a growing need for more trained cybersecurity professionals.

  • U Nevada-Reno’s programs Designated Center of Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense (CAE-CD)

    The National Security Agency (NSA) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) co-sponsor Centers for Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense (CAE-CD). The aim of the program is to ensure cyber defense professionals graduate from institutions of higher education with theoretical and hands-on experience in cybersecurity. After a rigorous review process, the University of Nevada-Reno’s B.S. in computer science with a minor in cybersecurity was recently designated a CAE-CD.

  • Students Take Witness Stand in Virtual Courtroom

    USC students took the stand as part of the capstone project in their advanced digital forensics class at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering. In years past, students in the class traveled to a real courtroom, but this year the COVID-19 pandemic pushed them to a digital venue: a videoconference on Zoom.

  • Studying Ideologically Motivated Cyberattacks

    A John Jay College of Criminal Justice project on cyberterrorism is one of 13 selected by the Department of Homeland Security as part of the National Counterterrorism Innovation, Technology, and Education (NCITE) Center, a new DHS Center of Excellence. The John Jay project will study and aggregate ideologically motivated cyberattacks and will create a new, unique dataset – the Cyber-Extremist Crime Database (Cyber-ECDB) – which will track ideologically motivated cyberattacks against U.S. targets from 1998 to present.

  • Artificial Intelligence Could Help Stem Tide of School Violence

    By leveraging the basics of artificial intelligence technology now used to predict risk for suicide or other mental health issues, researchers developed an AI system that analyzes linguistic patterns to predict a youth’s risk for committing acts of school violence.

  • Creating Virtual Cyber Defense Tool

    Researchers are helping protect the country’s most secretly held assets through a partnership that’s creating state-of-the-art, virtual cyberattack defenses. The researchers have customized an existing MSU-designed Netmapper computer program to develop next-generation cyber learning and training software that can scan and map the military’s complex computer network infrastructures.