• CyberForce Competition: Collegiate Students Try to Outwit Cyberattackers

    The cybersecurity field faces a shortfall of qualified professionals to fill nearly half a million open jobs. The CyberForce Competition, to be held on 13 November at the Argonne National Laboratory, will see college and university students from across the United States attempt to thwart a simulated cyberattacks. The competition seeks to inspire and help develop the next generation of energy sector cyber defenders.

  • The Only Way for the U.S. to Maintain Tech Edge Over China: STEM Immigration

    U.S. global technology leadership is under serious threat. Given current trends, it is inevitable that China will overtake the United States. The most powerful—and perhaps only—lasting and asymmetric American science and technology advantage over China is the U.S. ability to attract and retain international S&T talent. But the U.S. government risks squandering that advantage through poor immigration policy.

  • Protecting U.S. Critical Infrastructure from Cyberattacks

    Over the past year, there has been a sharp increase in cyberattacks using malware to target the systems of critical infrastructure such as utility companies, government agencies and organizations that provide services and products that we rely on daily.

  • Less than a Third of U.S. Parents Eager to Vaccinate Young Kids Against COVID-19

    The latest poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation found that only 27 percent of parents said they were eager to get their young children vaccinated against COVID-19. Thirty percent said they would definitely not get their child vaccinated, and 33 percent said they would take a wait-and-see approach.

  • Parents Were Fine with Sweeping School Vaccination Mandates Five Decades Ago – but COVID-19 May Be a Different Story

    The ongoing battles over COVID-19 vaccination in the U.S. are likely to get more heated when the Food and Drug Administration authorizes emergency use of a vaccine for children ages 5 to 11, expected later this fall. As a public health historian who studies the evolution of vaccination policies, I see stark differences between the current debates over COVID-19 vaccination and the public response to previous mandates.

  • Growing the U.S. AI Workforce

    A new policy brief Georgetown University’s Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET) addresses the need for a clearly defined artificial intelligence education and workforce policy.

  • Hacking for Homeland Security

    On Monday (4 September), the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced the launch of the third Hacking for Homeland Security (H4HS). Participating students will focus on challenges associated with cybersecurity information sharing within transportation, the latency issue at screening checkpoints, and address greenspace issues after natural disasters.

  • Cybercriminals Use Pandemic to Attack Schools and Colleges

    From Aug. 14 to Sept. 12, 2021, educational organizations were the target of over 5.8 million malware attacks, or 63% of all such attacks. Ransomware attacks alone impacted 1,681 U.S. schools, colleges and universities in 2020. Globally 44% of educational institutions were targeted by such attacks.

  • New Program: Hardware-Cybersecurity Education

    Many commonly reported cyberattacks focus on computer software vulnerabilities. But what about computer hardware? As complex global supply chains are stressed by the pandemic, risks increase of corporate or state espionage via hardware, such as malicious “trojan” circuits hidden on a motherboard by a shady third-party vendor.

  • New Cybersecurity Institute to train ROTC and DOD-skilled civilian workers

    Several academic institutions in the U.S. Northwest have joined to create the Northwest Virtual Institute for Cybersecurity Education and Research (CySER) program. The initiative, funded with a DOD award, will train ROTC and DOD-skilled civilian workers in computer science and other majors in cyber basics, operations, or defense, offering bachelor’s degrees as well as specialized certificates.

  • UGA: Hiring Initiative in Data Science, Artificial Intelligence

    Data science and artificial intelligence transform a range of fields, and the University of Georgia aims to recruit 50 faculty members over the next two years who will educate students and advance research in data science and AI.

  • Empathy Helps Teach Students about Cybersecurity and AI Ethics

    People generally agree that empathy is important in almost every aspect of daily life, but for many it has not been a priority in the development of technology, especially technology using artificial intelligence (AI). Researchers say it is a mistake, and are working to address this gap by using empathy to teach high school students about cybersecurity and AI ethics issues.

  • Training Next Gen AI, Cybersecurity Professionals

    With experience in preparing professionals for careers in cybersecurity, Indiana University has been awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation for a new project to train the next generation of the nation’s cybersecurity workforce to address vulnerabilities and identify threats using artificial intelligence.

  • Cybersecurity education to Help Communities Become More Cyber-Secure

    The NSA helps fund programs aiming to develop a community-wide K-12 cybersecurity program, support local industry and government to be more cyber resilient, and help local academic institutions to develop cybersecurity programs for students.

  • APL, UTSA: Collaborating on Cybersecurity, Resilience

    Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) has earned a reputation as one of the U.S. leading centers of research on public health, with an emphasis on national security. But one of the APL’s core competencies is cybersecurity and advanced analytics, focused on security concerns of the nation’s military. This dovetails with the UTSA National Security Collaboration Center’s (NSCC) mission. The two institutions are exploring collaboration options.