Hurricane SandyDeath, destruction in wake of Hurricane Sandy

Published 31 October 2012

Hurricane Sandy’s left millions along the U.S. East Coast without power or mass transit, in all likelihood for days; the U.S. death toll reached 48, with most of the dead being killed by falling trees; the hurricane cut power to more than 8.2 million across the East Coast; airlines canceled more than 15,000 flights; Sandy will end up causing about $20 billion in property damage and $10 billion to $30 billion more in lost business, making it one of the costliest natural disasters on record in the U.S. history

Hurricane Sandy’s left millions along the U.S. East Coast without power or mass transit, in all likelihood for days. The U.S. death toll reached 48, with most of the dead being killed by falling trees.

Other consequences of the hurricane:

  • The hurricane cut power to more than 8.2 million across the East Coast.
  • New York was hit hard, with the financial district closed for a second day.
  • The storm caused the worst damage in the 108-year history of the city’s subway system. Mayor Michael Bloomberg said it could be four or five days before the U.S. biggest transit system was running again.
  • Sandy also killed sixty-nine people in the Caribbean before making its way up the Eastern Seaboard.
  • Airlines canceled more than 15,000 flights. New York City’s three major airports remained closed.
  • Some bridges into the city reopened at midday, but most major tunnels and bridges remained closed, as were schools and Broadway theaters.
  • Fox News reports that the storm sent a nearly 14-foot surge of seawater, a record, coursing over Lower Manhattan’s seawalls and highways and into low-lying streets. The water inundated tunnels, subway stations, and the electrical system that powers Wall Street.
  • NYU hospital had to be evacuated after its backup power system failed.
  • A large tanker ship ran aground on the city’s Staten Island.
  • By midday Tuesday, Sandy was half way through Pennsylvania, moving steadily westward with winds of 45 mph. The storm was supposed to make a U-turn back into New York State Tuesday night.
  • Sandy also brought blizzard conditions to West Virginia and neighboring Appalachian states, with more than two feet of snow expected in some places.
  • IHS Global Insight, a forecasting firm, said Sandy will end up causing about $20 billion in property damage and $10 billion to $30 billion more in lost business, making it one of the costliest natural disasters on record in the U.S. history.
  • President Barack Obama declared a major disaster in New York and Long Island, making federal funding available to residents of the area.
  • The New York Stock Exchange was closed for a second day, the first time that has happened because of weather since the Blizzard of 1888. The NYSE  reopens today.
  • Between 80 and 100 homes were destroyed in a fire in Queens, near the Atlantic Ocean.
  • In New Jersey, Sandy cut off barrier islands, swept houses from their foundations, and wrecked several boardwalks up and down the coast, tearing away a section of Atlantic City’s promenade. Atlantic City’s twelve waterfront casinos were not damaged.
  • Chicago officials warned residents to stay away from the Lake Michigan shore as the city prepared for winds of up to 60 mph and waves exceeding 24 feet well into Wednesday.

 

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