• 3-in-1 water monitoring system

    All water treatment plants using membrane technology are required to be able to perform three processes to comply with international standards: identify whether there are any bacteria or contaminants; detect any broken membrane filters in the treatment plant; and pinpoint which filter is broken — accurate to 1 in 100,000 filters; a new, innovative device performs all three processes

  • Smartphone app offers sex offender information

    Two of the providers of technology to local sheriffs’ offices have announced a new content publishing agreement that will offer the public information on sex offenders

  • New salmonella species food safety test kit

    Salmonella is a genus of bacteria that are a major cause of foodborne illnesses throughout the world. The bacteria are generally transmitted to humans through the consumption of contaminated food; new salmonella test kit unveiled

  • Key to U.S. future prosperity: world-class research universities

    American research universities are essential for U.S. prosperity and security, but the institutions are in danger of serious decline unless the federal government, states, and industry take action to ensure adequate, stable funding in the next decade, says a new report by the National Research Council; “The talent, innovative ideas, and new technologies produced by U.S. research universities have led to some of our finest national achievements, from the modern agricultural revolution to the accessibility of the World Wide Web,” says the chairman of the committee that wrote the report

  • Airport security screening technology market to grow

    In 2011, TSA distributed approximately $437.1 million in contract obligations toward airport screening technologies; this amount is likely to grow in coming years as airport security authorities look for technology which would allow them to balance the requirements of tight security, on the one hand, and demands from the public for faster and less intrusive screening measures

  • Quick-curing concrete for infrastructure, mining disaster recovery

    A quick-curing concrete can be sprayed to reinforce structures — buildings, runways, tunnels, bridges, dams – damaged by an act of terror or natural disaster; the spraying can be done almost immediately, before the structure fails catastrophically, providing safety for rescue workers who risk their lives minutes after disasters hit, and for still stranded in or near the damaged structure

  • Saab shows new CBRN detection system

    Saab introduces a new concept in CBRN detection: a CBRN detection and warning system designed for use by non-specialists in the field

  • U.K. bans ad campaign using images of 7/2005 terrorist attacks images

    The U.K. Advertising Standards Authority has banned an advertising campaign by a fortified window glass maker which used images of the 5 July 2005 terrorist bombing in London; the company’s mailing warned businesses of terrorist sleeper cells which were likely to be activated during the coming Olympic Games

  • Robbing banks doesn’t pay: econometrics study

    The average takings per person per successful bank raid are a modest £12,706.60, equivalent to less than six months’ average wage in the United Kingdom; in the United States the average raid yields considerably less – just $4,330 per person per successful raid; if a robber carries out multiple raids to boost his sub-average income, probability says that after four raids he will be inside for some time and unable to earn at all

  • Raytheon demonstrates missiles to engage swarms of small boats

    In the event of a military a U.S.-Iran military clash, the Iranian Navy plans to use hundreds of small boats, equipped with anti-ship missiles, to attack larger U.S. ships in the waters of the Persian Gulf; the Griffin B missile from Raytheon aims to offer an answer to the small-boat problem, and the company says that in a recent live-fire demonstration, the U.S. Navy proved the ability of the Griffin B missile to engage rapidly moving small boats

  • CBP receives Lockheed Martin P-3 Orion ahead of schedule

    The P-3 Orion is considered the standard for maritime patrol and reconnaissance, and is used for homeland security, hurricane reconnaissance, anti-piracy operations, humanitarian relief, search and rescue, intelligence gathering, antisubmarine warfare and, recently, to assist in air traffic control and natural disaster relief support

  • Guidelines for securing business records in hurricane season

    A data protection specialist developed best practices guidelines to assist businesses along the Atlantic coastline to assess their business continuity in preparation for the hurricane season

  • London’s financial district employees say City unprepared for Olympics

    Nearly 70 percent of investment bank staff think that the City, London’s financial district, is lagging behind in preparation for the Summer Olympic Games, with nearly half of respondents unsure whether their company has a Business Continuity Plan (BCP) in place

  • Day of wide-spread domestic drone use nears

    So far, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration( FAA) has issued 266 active testing permits for civilian-drone applications, but has yet to allow drones wide-scale access to U.S. airspace; law enforcement and industry officials say that it is only a matter of time before the FAA would allow the more than 18,000 law enforcement agencies and departments to begin to use drones for surveillance

  • Psychemedics receives additional FDA clearances for hair analysis drug testing

    Psychemedics developed a technology, using FDA-cleared radioimmunoassays (RIA), for the detection of drugs of abuse, and says it was the first laboratory to receive FDA clearances ten years ago for screening assays used in hair testing for drugs of abuse; the technology detects cocaine, opiates, PCP, methamphetamine, and marijuana using enzyme immunoassay (EIA) analysis of head and body hair