Companies / JVs / Partnerships

  • Food safety moves up on Americans' agenda

    The problem of food safety has been very much on the minds of Americans this summer; the government and the private sector are doing more to address the problem

  • Mississippi company develops elevated acoustic sensor

    Acoustic sensors are typically located on the ground; a Mississippi company developed an elevated acoustic sensor that can be mounted on a balloon; the sensor can be combined with a camera to create a visual and auditory sensor

  • "Point-and-toss" UAV in field demonstration

    Florida-based IATech used the Association for Unmanned Vehicle Systems International’s biannual field demonstration to show its point-and-toss UAV: the unit measures 3 feet across and is thrown like a paper airplane; it costs only about $25,000

  • DA-42 UAV tested

    Israeli Aeronautics Defense Systems tests new UAV; the system can stay airborne for up to 28 hours with a 900-pound payload

  • All-titanium campus bridge show way for defense industry

    University of Akron, Defense Metals Technology Center co-sponsor design contest for titanium pedestrian bridge on university’s campus; titanium is a strong, lightweight, virtually corrosion-proof (but expensive) metal; a high-profile venture demonstrating titanium’s feasibility in commercial infrastructure projects could spark greater demand and open new markets for titanium
    ‘Avant-garde’ all-titanium span could spur other projects - and cut Pentagon’s costs

  • Power companies seek federal funds for smart grid

    The Obama administration has placed a priority on smart grid technology, and Congress has approved $3.4 billion in federal grants for smart grid projects nationwide

  • Smart grid gold rush

    The competition among companies offering smart grid technology has grown to be pretty fierce in recent years, even more so lately given the $11 billion allocated in the federal government’s American Reinvestment and Recovery Act

  • Force Protection stumbles

    Force Protection Q2 profit lags Street; in June, Force Protection lost a $1.1 billion Afghanistan truck deal to Oshkosh Corp.

  • Study highlights air cargo security failings

    New study: “these weak spots [in air cargo security] increase the security risk of worldwide transport, which can result in the disruption of logistical processes with considerable economic losses”

  • Kemesa: Solving the identity theft problem

    The ideal solution to the online identity theft problem is to not transmit personal information to Web sites in the first place; with Kemesa’s Shop Shield, personal information can not be stolen because it is never revealed during the online transaction process

  • Cobham reports a 32 percent increase in first-half profits

    Company benefits from strategic investments in military and government markets; its work with M/A-COM, which it acquired from Tyco Electronics in September 2008, had resulted in increased technology collaboration and new contract awards

  • DARPA acquires British hi-tech fabric vehicle armor

    U.K. company Amsafe developed hi-tech cloth which protects vehicles from RPGs and other rockets; DARPA, which has been trying for a long time to develop similar material under the RPGnets program, decides to order test quantities of the U.K. material

  • First Israeli business delegation visits Indonesia

    The Indonesian military wanted to buy Israel UAVs in order better to patrol the vast archipelago, but the Indonesian House of Representatives rejected the plan

  • Novartis starts human testing of swine flu vaccine

    The Swiss company began testing its swine flu vaccine in 6,000 people of all ages in Britain, Germany, and the United States; the vaccine will likely be on the market before the trial finishes

  • Universities, businesses offer solutions for dealing with hurricanes

    Three universities are busy offering solutions which better predict hurricanes and cope with the damage they cause; a Bill Gates-supported company is more ambitious: it proposes to kill hurricanes by placing giant ocean-going tubs in the paths of storms